1853 June 2 Letter to "Brothers Little and Smith"

Title

1853 June 2 Letter to "Brothers Little and Smith"

Description

Letter concerns contracts to build bridges and a road, as well as the discovery of coal beds. Includes an update on the availability of timber and powder.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

'Brother' Little
'Brother' Smith

Date

1853/06/02

Location

Great Salt Lake City
Utah Territory

Subject

Building and Construction

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City, June 2/53

Brothers Little & Smith
Dear Brethren,
Yours of May arrived duly and I was pleased to hear of your coal discoveries, and your labors on the road leading to the coal beds, though I am somewhat surrised at the large amount of the contracts for a small bridge & portion of the road, & shall take the liberty of bridges and road when I visit that region, and expressing my judgment on the economy of the application of the accounts named ; in the meantime go ahead, dig away and get out the coal, using the best economy and judgment you have, for I am very anxious to have good Iron in abundance, and of our own manufacture.
There is no powder at present in the market. The County Court has control of the timber in the Kanyons &c
We are all well, and highly prospered and as usual doing all we can, to roll on the work that is upon our shoulders.
Ferrimore Little & all his folks are well.
I remain as ever
Your Bro. in the Gospel of Peace

Brigham Young

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City,  June  2/53

Brothers Little & Smith

Dear Brethren,

Yours of May [illegible] arrived duly [illegible] and I was pleased to hear of your coal discoveries, and your labors on the road leading to the coal beds, though I am somewhat surrised at the large amount of the contracts for a small bridge & portion of the road, & shall take the liberty of [illegible] bridges and road when I visit that region, and expressing my judgment on the economy of the application of the accounts named ; in the meantime go ahead, dig away and get out the coal, using the best economy and judgment you have, for I am very anxious to have good Iron in abundance, and of our own manufacture.

There is no powder at present in the market. The County Court has control of the timber in the Kanyons &c

We are all well, and highly prospered and as usual doing all we can, to roll on the work that is upon our shoulders.

Ferrimore Little & all his folks are well.

I remain as ever
Your Bro. in the Gospel of Peace

Brigham Young