1854 January 31 Letter to Orson Pratt

Title

1854 January 31 Letter to Orson Pratt

Description

Update on Indian Affairs, the Legislature and weather. Clarifies the reason for publishing simpler doctrine in the "Seer" and gives instructions for returning to Utah.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Letter to Orson Pratt

Date

1854 January 31

Location

Great Salt Lake City, U. T.
Washington City D. C.

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Indian Affairs
Church Doctrine
Overland Travel
Ecclesiastical

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City, U. T. Jany. 31/54
Dear Brother Orson,
Yours of Nov. 4th. arrived on the l0th of December last, which will explain the late date of my answer.
At present, our Indian difficulties are at an end, as part of Walker's band are in the Uinta Valley, blocked in by snow, and Walker and the balance are among the Navajoes. What their conduct will be in the spring I am unable to say, but we shall continue to complete our defences, and act with caution, and vigilance, and shall endeavor to make them understand the folly of presisting in hostility toward us.
In alluding to certain Doctrine published in the "Seer," I did so with the best of feeling, and not with an idea that any harm had accrued therefrom, or would; and, as I wrote at the time, I presumed the "Seer" might obtain a more extended circulation by treating more upon simpler subjects, and those Doctrines that more immediately concerned unbeleivers; hence there is no occasion for you to disquiet yourself on account of the item your commented upon in your last.
The Legislative Assembly adjourned on the 20th inst., after a very amicable and useful Session of the allotted 40 Days. The weather continued unusually mild until a short time past and since that has been colder than any we have experienced since our Settlement, the thermometer having been 18 Degrees below Zero at 1 o.clock A. M. It is now pleasant again.
In accordance with the advice forwarded you by last mail, I expect you will return with Bro Eldredge next season, rendering him such aid previous to starting, and on the plains, as your wisdom may dictate, and not leaving the train until you meet someone having written instructions to relieve, as there will be much valuable property, and a large train in your united charge, and I wish as far as possible, to prevent chances for loss or damages.

My own health, that of your family and of the people at large continues good.
Prest. Willard Richards is very unwell and has been for several days past, though hopes of his recovery are entertained.
Of course you are aware that it is your privilege and duty to counsel the Elders sent from here to labor in the States, and the West Indies, as also all Saints in the States who seek your Counsel, or who you know to be going astray.
Ever praying for your welfare and guidance by the Spirit.

I Remain

Prof. Orson Pratt Your Brother in the Covenant
Washington City Brigham Young
D. C.
P. S.
When about to leave for home, You may make such
disposition of the Seer, as yourbest judgment may dictate.



P. S. Upon the receipt of this, you will please notify the Elders in the States, who were sent from here, that they are at liberty to tarry or return as they please. You can do this by letter, or by a notice in the "Seer."
B. Y.

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City, U. T. Jany. 31/54

Dear Brother Orson,

Yours of Nov. 4th. arrived on the l0th of December last, which will explain the late date of my answer.

At present, our Indian difficulties are at an end, as part of Walker's band are in the Uinta Valley, blocked in by snow, and Walker and the balance are among the Navajoes. What their conduct will be in the spring I am unable to say, but we shall continue to complete our defences, and act with caution, and vigilance, and shall endeavor to make them understand the folly of presisting in hostility toward us.

In alluding to certain Doctrine published in the "Seer," I did so with the best of feeling, and not with an idea that any harm had accrued therefrom, or would; and, as I wrote at the time, I presumed the "Seer" might obtain a more extended circulation by treating more upon simpler subjects, and those Doctrines that more immediately concerned unbeleivers; hence there is no occasion for you to disquiet yourself on account of the item your commented upon in your last.

The Legislative Assembly adjourned on the 20th inst., after a very amicable and useful Session of the allotted 40 Days. The weather continued unusually mild until a short time past and since that has been colder than any we have experienced since our Settlement, the thermometer having been 18 Degrees below Zero at 1 o.clock A. M. It is now pleasant again.

In accordance with the advice forwarded you by last mail, I expect you will return with Bro Eldredge next season, rendering him such aid previous to starting, and on the plains, as your wisdom may dictate, and not leaving the train until you meet someone having written instructions to relieve, as there will be much valuable property, and a large train in your united charge, and I wish as far as possible, to prevent chances for loss or damages.

My own health, that of your family and of the people at large continues good.

Prest. Willard Richards is very unwell and has been for several days past, though hopes of his recovery are entertained.

Of course you are aware that it is your privilege and duty to counsel the Elders sent from here to labor in the States, and the West Indies, as also all Saints in the States who seek your Counsel, or who you know to be going astray.

Ever praying for your welfare and guidance by the Spirit.

I Remain
Your Brother in the Covenant 
Brigham Young

Prof. Orson Pratt
Washington City
D. C.

P. S.
When about to leave for home, You may make such
disposition of the Seer, as your best judgment may dictate.

P. S. Upon the receipt of this, you will please notify the Elders in the States, who were sent from here, that they are at liberty to tarry or return as they please. You can do this by letter, or by a notice in the "Seer."
B. Y.