1853 July 31 Letter to Nelson Higgins

Title

1853 July 31 Letter to Nelson Higgins

Description

Regretting the loss of 200 head of stock and reaffirming previous orders to send stock to Salt Lake and secure the settlement.

Type

Correspondence
Indian Affairs

Sender

Daniel H. Wells

Recipient

Nelson Higgins

Date

1853 July 31

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

3

Subject

Indian Affairs
Nauvoo Legion
Safety

extracted text

Head Quarters Nauvoo Legion
Adjutant General's Office
G..S. L. City July 31 1853.
To Major Nelson Higgins
Commanding Sanpete
Military Dictrict
Dear Sir,
Your express of the 29th inst. reached here about 1/2 past 11 O.clock P. M. on the 30th which brings information of the loss of 200 head of Stock from Allred's Settlement in your District.
It is much to be regretted, thus to lose Cattle and Horses, the more especially to lose them not only to our own loss, but to the advantage of our enemies.
If our friends were benefitted by it, then it would not appear quite so hard to bear, but this is but a trifling matter in comparison to loss of life.
You remark, "that if you had sufficient forces, that you think a portion might be recovered," Tis true they might, and then again they might not, and Men and animals might be lost, and lost in chasing after the Indians in pursuit of them through the Mountains. They have too much the start to render such a course practicable.
What then shall we do, is the Question? Shall we let the Indians drive off our stock with impunity, and not seek to recover it? An Ounce of Prevention is worth a Pound of Cure!
Now, instead of wasting our time in fruitless repining, or risking our lives by pursuing after them. let us secure what we have left!

If that Settlement had been able to maintain their position, and been properly on the lookout and guarded their property as they should
have done they would not have suffered.
We now consider that that Settlem<e>nt had better be secured, in order
that your position in Manti may be strengthened and so that you do not meet with a like calamity, and then preserve your Stock, you had better send it away and have it brought to this Place in accordance with "Orders" and instructions before forwarded to you.
Now have your Grain thrashed out as fast as it becomes dry enough, and preserve it, lest famine shall come upon us. Nothing but a of defence, will answer in all our settlements.
You have received orders, we have no time to repeat them, let them be carried out,but it is not profitable to run after Indians.
If they at Allred's Settlement has been properly prepared to receive the Indians, when they came for their Stock, they could have met them on their own ground, without hunting after them in the Mountains.

Daniel H. Wells
Leut. General Commanding
Nauvoo Legion
P. S.
The Express which brought the News of
driving the Stock from Allred's
Settlement, came in about Midnight, and I
immediately proceeded to lay the

matter before the Governor.
He gave me my instructions what to say,
as I have endeavored to as above, and
was entirely unwilling that Men
should be sent out after the Indians.
D. H. W.

Item sets

 

Head Quarters Nauvoo Legion
Adjutant General's Office
G..S. L. City July 31 1853.

To Major Nelson Higgins
Commanding Sanpete
Military Dictrict

Dear Sir,

Your express of the 29th inst. reached here about 1/2 past 11 O.clock P. M. on the 30th which brings information of the loss of 200 head of Stock from Allred's Settlement in your District.

It is much to be regretted, thus to lose Cattle and Horses, the more especially to lose them not only to our own loss, but to the advantage of our enemies.

If our friends were benefitted by it, then it would not appear quite so hard to bear, but this is but a trifling matter in comparison to loss of life.

You remark, "that if you had sufficient forces, that you think a portion might be recovered," Tis true they might, and then again they might not, and Men and animals might be lost, and lost in chasing after the Indians in pursuit of them through the Mountains. They have too much the start to render such a course practicable.

What then shall we do, is the Question? Shall we let the Indians drive off our stock with impunity, and not seek to recover it? An Ounce of Prevention is worth a Pound of Cure!

Now, instead of wasting our time in fruitless repining, or risking our lives by pursuing after them. let us secure what we have left!

If that Settlement had been able to maintain their position, and been properly on the lookout and guarded their property as they should
have done they would not have suffered.

We now consider that that Settlem<e>nt had better be secured, in order
that your position in Manti may be strengthened and so that you do not meet with a like calamity, and then preserve your Stock, you had better send it away and have it brought to this Place in accordance with "Orders" and instructions before forwarded to you.

Now have your Grain thrashed out as fast as it becomes dry enough, and preserve it, lest famine shall come upon us. Nothing but a of defence, will answer in all our settlements.

You have received orders, we have no time to repeat them, let them be carried out,but it is not profitable to run after Indians.

If they at Allred's Settlement has been properly prepared to receive the Indians, when they came for their Stock, they could have met them on their own ground, without hunting after them in the Mountains.

Daniel H. Wells
Leut. General Commanding
Nauvoo Legion

P. S.
The Express which brought the News of
driving the Stock from Allred's
Settlement, came in about Midnight, and I
immediately proceeded to lay the
matter before the Governor.

He gave me my instructions what to say,
as I have endeavored to as above, and
was entirely unwilling that Men
should be sent out after the Indians.
D. H. W.