1854 January 31 Letter to John M. Bernhisel

Title

1854 January 31 Letter to John M. Bernhisel

Description

Examples of the lack of performance by those sent to govern the Territory and the letter was to include copies of memorials passed by the Utah Legislature.

Type

Correspondence
Governement/Legislature

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

John M. Bernhisel

Date

1854 January 31

Location

Great Salt Lake City
Washington City, D. C.

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Government

extracted text

Utah Territory
Great Salt Lake City, Jany 31st/54
Hon J. M. Bernhisel
Washington City,
D. C.
Dear Sir,
I enclose you a printed Copy of the Memorials passed by the Legislative Assembly of Utah, which you will please do the best with, that circumstances will admit of.
This letter, and accompanying papers, are sent by A. W. Babbitt, Secretary for Utah.
Written copies of the same Memorials are enclosed with a letter to you, and sent by the Eastern mail; this course has been adopted to insure their safe arrival.
It is a subject of regret in Utah that the President, and Congress continue to visit upon us the early extravagances of Minnesota in their printing <bills> and have no more courtesy for our patriotism than to send as Secretary the run away, or are afraid to pay what is simply just, or worse still, send us an apostate, who, up to the present date has on the one hand, pretended to wish to pay all bills that could possibly be allowed, but on the other has been more meanly penurious than Ferris was. In case Babbit boasts of his influence in Utah, in a manner designed to hinder your desired progress, you are at liberty to inform the Hon. S. A. Douglas and any others you choose, that Hon A. W. Babbitt would not be elected by the People of this Territory to the Office of Pathmaster, or even Pound Keeper, unless the Office must be filled, and no one else could be found to accept of it; this is a fair statement of his boasted influence in Utah.
Prest. Willard Richards is very unwell, and his recovery doubtful; on which account Babbitt has already began to busy himself about his successor in the Post Office, and talks about Joseph E. Johnson for that Office.
In case you learn that the Post Office in this City is vacant, I wish you to endeavor to have Elias Smith appointed Postmaster.
In times past Babbitt has done much good, and could again, if he would let his common sense have fair play; but whether he will do so, remains to be proved by his future course, which should be very different from what it has been since he received the appointment of Secretary.
Ever praying for your welfare and success. I Remain
Truly your friend

Brigham Young

Item sets

 

Utah Territory
Great Salt Lake City, Jany 31st/54

Hon J. M. BernhiselWashington City,
D. C.

Dear Sir,

I enclose you a printed Copy of the Memorials passed by the Legislative Assembly of Utah, which you will please do the best with, that circumstances will admit of.

This letter, and accompanying papers, are sent by A. W. Babbitt, Secretary for Utah.  Written copies of the same Memorials are enclosed with a letter to you, and sent by the Eastern mail; this course has been adopted to insure their safe arrival.

It is a subject of regret in Utah that the President, and Congress continue to visit upon us the early extravagances of Minnesota in their printing <bills> and have no more courtesy for our patriotism than to send as Secretary the run away, or are afraid to pay what is simply just, or worse still, send us an apostate, who, up to the present date has on the one hand, pretended to wish to pay all bills that could possibly be allowed, but on the other has been more meanly penurious than Ferris was. In case Babbit boasts of his influence in Utah, in a manner designed to hinder your desired progress, you are at liberty to inform the Hon. S. A. Douglas and any others you choose, that Hon A. W. Babbitt would not be elected by the People of this Territory to the Office of Pathmaster, or even Pound Keeper, unless the Office must be filled, and no one else could be found to accept of it; this is a fair statement of his boasted influence in Utah.

Prest. Willard Richards is very unwell, and his recovery doubtful; on which account Babbitt has already began to busy himself about his successor in the Post Office, and talks about Joseph E. Johnson for that Office.

In case you learn that the Post Office in this City is vacant, I wish you to endeavor to have Elias Smith appointed Postmaster.

In times past Babbitt has done much good, and could again, if he would let his common sense have fair play; but whether he will do so, remains to be proved by his future course, which should be very different from what it has been since he received the appointment of Secretary.

Ever praying for your welfare and success. I Remain
Truly your friend

Brigham Young