1854 March 17 Letter to Isaac Houston and Thomas J. McCullough

Title

1854 March 17 Letter to Isaac Houston and Thomas J. McCullough

Description

Brigham expresses satisfaction with the safeguards established in Mountainville.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Isaac Houston and Thomas J. McCullough

Date

1854 March 17

Location

Great Salt Lake City
Mountainville

Subject

Indian Affairs
Settlements

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City, Mar. 17th. 1854.
Bishop Isaac Houston
and Tho[s]. J. McCullough, Mountainville.
Dear brethren,
Your letter of the 15th. inst with the accompanying sketch of your fort are before me, and I am highly satisfied with both. Owing to your peculiar position, in my opinion you are perfectly safe with the numbers you have, or may have after the number you mention is gone, provided you continue diligent in well doing, and finish your safeguards with reasonable despatch.
I do not deem it necessary to counsel any persons to go to your place, or to restrain those from leaving who desire to: being persuaded that it is best to allow each one the largest scope of reasonable liberty; and being satisfied that the security and advantages of your position will induce plenty of volunteer settlers to join you who, in this case, might be the most permanent, satisfied, and united.
Praying for your welfare in well doing
I remain your bro[r]. in the Covenant.

Brigham Young

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City, Mar. 17th. 1854.

Bishop Isaac Houston
and Tho[s]. J. McCullough, Mountainville.

Dear brethren,

Your letter of the 15th. inst with the accompanying sketch of your fort are before me, and I am highly satisfied with both. Owing to your peculiar position, in my opinion you are perfectly safe with the numbers you have, or may have after the number you mention is gone, provided you continue diligent in well doing, and finish your safeguards with reasonable despatch.

I do not deem it necessary to counsel any persons to go to your place, or to restrain those from leaving who desire to: being persuaded that it is best to allow each one the largest scope of reasonable liberty; and being satisfied that the security and advantages of your position will induce plenty of volunteer settlers to join you who, in this case, might be the most permanent, satisfied, and united.

Praying for your welfare in well doing
I remain your bro[r]. in the Covenant.

Brigham Young