1854 March 24 Letter to Captain Walker [Walkara]

Title

1854 March 24 Letter to Captain Walker [Walkara]

Description

Brigham attempts to re-establish friendly relations with Walker. He prevented the soldiers from attacking and advises Walker to raise grain and cattle. He also clarifies that only the U. S. President can authorize the purchase of their land.

Type

Correspondence
Indian Affairs

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Captain Walker [Walkara]

Date

1854 March 24

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

3

Subject

Indian Affairs
Property
Disputes

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City, Mar. 24th 1854.
Captain Walker, Chief of the Utahs.

I, Brigham Young, your brother, send you this letter, by your old friend Dimick. I am glad to hear that you feel friendly towards us, for I have always said that you was not mad but that you could not restrain your men. I have never been made with you nor said that you was a liar; but have always held and esteemed you as my brother. I sent for my men to come home as soon as I found that they were following you and told them to take care of their stock and themselves but not go after you nor your men.
I dreamed that you felt bad for what your men had done and would help it if you could but that you could not and that you wanted to be friendly but was afraid to come here, and then I thought that God whispered in your ear and you thought that you would come and see me and then you did come and we were friends and we put our arms about each other just as we used to and we felt first rate with each other and you said that we were brothers, and that we would be good friends fast friends and be at peace good peace and that our men should fight no more. Now brother Walker. I do want to see you and I should like to have you come to this city to our big meeting on the 6th of April. We have these meetings twice a year and talk a great deal to the people and you can hear and speak if you wish to, and Dimick can be by your side to tell you what is said and tell what you say

I have a few things to tell you about the killing of Capt Gunnison and his party who were slain near Fillmore on the Sevier by the Pahvantes. The Americans think that it was you that did that act and are very mad about it, and threated to send troops against you, but I have told them that it was not you nor your men and that you did not know anything about it, and I shall use all my endeavors to make them understand the truth about it so that they may not send out their troops either against you nor the Pahvantes, altho' the Pahvants did not do right in killing them. It always results having to go to war and kill each other this not good. Now you do know that we are your friends, the very best friends that you have got and that so long as you and your men do right you will always be safe and well treated by us. We have no desire to harm you not in the least, but on the contrary want to do you good.
I can tell you what is best for you and your men, You should settle down somewhere and go to raising grain and cattle and live in peace with us and with each other, and with every body else. Have you never heard how the Indians have always been used up when they warred with the whites, and that the Indians have almost always been destroyed when they come in contact with the whites? If you have never heard of this before I now tell you it is the truth. Now we wish to preserve you and your nation. There is not much game now, you know that yourself, and that you would be much more comfortable if you were to follow my counsel and raise grain and cattle. We can have the peace if you will let us.
About buying your land, I cannot talk about that at present, We shall have to wait for that until our great Father the President shall authorise us to do so; but we will make you some presents and do as well as we can by you with you if you will come here to our great meeting as I wish you to.
Listen to bro Dimick and the Agent Mr. Bedell who was sent out by the President to look after his red children in this country and come and see me and we can talk over all these matters better than we dan write them. May God bless and preserve you, & enlighten your mind to see the good & reject the evil is the prayer of your friend & brother,

Brigham Young

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City, Mar. 24th 1854.

Captain Walker, Chief of the Utahs.

I, Brigham Young, your brother, send you this letter, by your old friend Dimick. I am glad to hear that you feel friendly towards us, for I have always said that you was not mad but that you could not restrain your men. I have never been made with you nor said that you was a liar; but have always held and esteemed you as my brother. I sent for my men to come home as soon as I found that they were following you and told them to take care of their stock and themselves but not go after you nor your men.

I dreamed that you felt bad for what your men had done and would help it if you could but that you could not and that you wanted to be friendly but was afraid to come here, and then I thought that God whispered in your ear and you thought that you would come and see me and then you did come and we were friends and we put our arms about each other just as we used to and we felt first rate with each other and you said that we were brothers, and that we would be good friends fast friends and be at peace good peace and that our men should fight no more. Now brother Walker. I do want to see you and I should like to have you come to this city to our big meeting on the 6th of April. We have these meetings twice a year and talk a great deal to the people and you can hear and speak if you wish to, and Dimick can be by your side to tell you what is said and tell what you say

I have a few things to tell you about the killing of Capt Gunnison and his party who were slain near Fillmore on the Sevier by the Pahvantes. The Americans think that it was you that did that act and are very mad about it, and threated to send troops against you, but I have told them that it was not you nor your men and that you did not know anything about it, and I shall use all my endeavors to make them understand the truth about it so that they may not send out their troops either against you nor the Pahvantes, altho' the Pahvants did not do right in killing them. It always results having to go to war and kill each other this not good. Now you do know that we are your friends, the very best friends that you have got and that so long as you and your men do right you will always be safe and well treated by us. We have no desire to harm you not in the least, but on the contrary want to do you good.

I can tell you what is best for you and your men, You should settle down somewhere and go to raising grain and cattle and live in peace with us and with each other, and with every body else. Have you never heard how the Indians have always been used up when they warred with the whites, and that the Indians have almost always been destroyed when they come in contact with the whites? If you have never heard of this before I now tell you it is the truth. Now we wish to preserve you and your nation. There is not much game now, you know that yourself, and that you would be much more comfortable if you were to follow my counsel and raise grain and cattle. We can have the peace if you will let us.

About buying your land, I cannot talk about that at present, We shall have to wait for that until our great Father the President shall authorise us to do so; but we will make you some presents and do as well as we can by you with you if you will come here to our great meeting as I wish you to.

Listen to bro Dimick and the Agent Mr. Bedell who was sent out by the President to look after his red children in this country and come and see me and we can talk over all these matters better than we dan write them. May God bless and preserve you, & enlighten your mind to see the good & reject the evil is the prayer of your friend & brother,

Brigham Young