1854 May 21 Letter to Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball

Title

1854 May 21 Letter to Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball

Description

Informing Young and Kimball that counsel was given to sustain the poor through donations outside of tithing, the Northern settlements have sent in their spare wheat and two deaths have occurred.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

J. M. Grant

Recipient

Brigham Young
Heber C. Kimball

Date

1854 May 21

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

3

Subject

Tithing
Missionary Work
Charity

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City May 21st 1854
Presidents B. Young &
Heber C. Kimball
Dear Brethren,
The mail being about to leave for the south, I have thought it advisable to inform you, how we are getting along since you left.
On Saturday the 13tn inst. two letters were received at the General Tithing Office from Bishop James G. Browning of Ogden, stating that no more wheat could be had from that office till harvest, and the team that went for wheat there, only received 15 Bushels. When I got in possession of this fact, I immediately notified the several Bishops in this City, that they must look to the residents of their each respective Wards, for provisions to sustain their poor until the presiding Bishop should return, with the big keys to unlock the the treasures of grain, which we are unable to find in his absence; and also informed them, if they failed to receive the necessary assistance from their Wards, that they had better apply to the Select men of the County, or the County Court for some of its funds, to aid them, as the Laws of Utah, were ostensibly made for the purpose of being a shield to the Church, & providing for the poor.

On Monday the 15th, Bros. Hiram B. Clawson & Charles F. Decker, started & visited all the Northern Settlements, with written instructions to the different Bishops, requesting them to give their aid & influence in returning all the wheat that the brethren could possibly spare; they returned on the 19th and reported success in securing by promise & Contract, to the Amount of 1400 bushels, at $2.00 pr. Bushel. Flour $6.00 pr. hundred, with but few exceptions, and the brethren in that Section voted unanimously, that every Bushel of Wheat & pound of flour that they could spare would be forth coming to the Church, and emigrants should not have from them an ounce this season.
This quantity will help along for the time being, but I am inclined to think, that it will but little more than supply the demand until your return; in that event would it not be a good move to wake up the Bishops & Brethren South to this important matter, in order to effectually sustain, and carry on the Public works until harvest?
Bro Orson Hyde returned from Fort Supply on the 13th after an absence of 12 days; left the brethren at the Fort in good health and spirits; met the Missionaries at Weber, prosecuting their journey with reasonable speed, and without any interruption by accidents, or high waters, neither likely to be.
Father John Smith is about the same as when Bro George A. left, and Sister Helen Rockwood's health is considerably improved.
Bro Hosea Cushing died on the 17th, and was buried on the 18th. Bro. H. B. Clawson's youngest child (daughter) died of the hooping cough on the 13th. The excavation for the foundation of the endowment house is done, and the hands are now busily engaged in excavating the foundation of Geo A's house. The wall around the Temple block is progressing rapidly, and the way that rock comes tumbling in, is surprising. The Mountainville Line, which Bro Wells reported would be here on friday last, has not yet come to hand.
Bros Mackintosh & Clawson attended to Walker's pony matter, it is on hand, and will be forwarded by the first opportunity, probably by this Mail if they will take it.
The water in City Creek has not annoyed us in the least yet, and present appearance would indicate, that it may not this season.
General good health prevails, and all of your families are enjoying reasonable good health as far as I know.

Ever praying for your welfare & Success,
I Remain as ever your Bother in the Gospel.
J. M. Grant.

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City May 21st 1854

Presidents B. Young &
Heber C. Kimball

Dear Brethren,

The mail being about to leave for the south, I have thought it advisable to inform you, how we are getting along since you left.

On Saturday the 13tn inst. two letters were received at the General Tithing Office from Bishop James G. Browning of Ogden, stating that no more wheat could be had from that office till harvest, and the team that went for wheat there, only received 15 Bushels. When I got in possession of this fact, I immediately notified the several Bishops in this City, that they must look to the residents of their each respective Wards, for provisions to sustain their poor until the presiding Bishop should return, with the big keys to unlock the the treasures of grain, which we are unable to find in his absence; and also informed them, if they failed to receive the necessary assistance from their Wards, that they had better apply to the Select men of the County, or the County Court for some of its funds, to aid them, as the Laws of Utah, were ostensibly made for the purpose of being a shield to the Church, & providing for the poor.

On Monday the 15th, Bros. Hiram B. Clawson & Charles F. Decker, started & visited all the Northern Settlements, with written instructions to the different Bishops, requesting them to give their aid & influence in returning all the wheat that the brethren could possibly spare; they returned on the 19th and reported success in securing by promise & Contract, to the Amount of 1400 bushels, at $2.00 pr. Bushel. Flour $6.00 pr. hundred, with but few exceptions, and the brethren in that Section voted unanimously, that every Bushel of Wheat & pound of flour that they could spare would be forth coming to the Church, and emigrants should not have from them an ounce this season.

This quantity will help along for the time being, but I am inclined to think, that it will but little more than supply the demand until your return; in that event would it not be a good move to wake up the Bishops & Brethren South to this important matter, in order to effectually sustain, and carry on the Public works until harvest?

Bro Orson Hyde returned from Fort Supply on the 13th after an absence of 12 days; left the brethren at the Fort in good health and spirits; met the Missionaries at Weber, prosecuting their journey with reasonable speed, and without any interruption by accidents, or high waters, neither likely to be.
Father John Smith is about the same as when Bro George A. left, and Sister Helen Rockwood's health is considerably improved.

Bro Hosea Cushing died on the 17th, and was buried on the 18th. Bro. H. B. Clawson's youngest child (daughter) died of the hooping cough on the 13th. The excavation for the foundation of the endowment house is done, and the hands are now busily engaged in excavating the foundation of Geo A's house. The wall around the Temple block is progressing rapidly, and the way that rock comes tumbling in, is surprising. The Mountainville Line, which Bro Wells reported would be here on friday last, has not yet come to hand.
Bros Mackintosh & Clawson attended to Walker's pony matter, it is on hand, and will be forwarded by the first opportunity, probably by this Mail if they will take it.

The water in City Creek has not annoyed us in the least yet, and present appearance would indicate, that it may not this season.
General good health prevails, and all of your families are enjoying reasonable good health as far as I know.

Ever praying for your welfare & Success,
I Remain as ever your Bother in the Gospel.
J. M. Grant.