1854 July 26 Letter to John D. Lee, Rufus Allen, Thomas D. Brown, et al.

Title

1854 July 26 Letter to John D. Lee, Rufus Allen, Thomas D. Brown, et al.

Description

Brigham offers suggestions for planting and completing the fort. He advises the Brethren to assist the Indians with their farming operations, fix their tools and if possible to live among them.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

John D. Lee
Rufus Allen
Thomas D. Brown

Date

1854 July 26

Location

Great Salt Lake City
Harmony

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Indian Affairs
Missionary Work
Crops

extracted text

G. S. L. City July 26th, 1854.
Bros. John D. Lee, Rufus Allen,
Thos. D. Brown, & the Brethren
at Harmony.
Dear Brethren,
Your letter of the 16th inst is received, and since, Bros. Riddle, Hamblin, Hardy , &c. have arrived in 6 (1/2) days from your place.
You have doubtless received the plat of your fort before this, as I sent it to you some time since by Bro Dame.
We have some considerable clothing on hand for Indian women & children. I intended to have sent some out by the brethren when they returned from the June Conference, but they could not carry it. I intend to send it the first opportunity. It is my desire that you go ahead with your Fort and improvements, and I have no doubt but that the water will so increase that you will have plenty another year. Sow your wheat early, & it will need but little if any irrigation. Remember your canals & ditches are new and run over dry soil, and that probably absorbs the water. It is not best to be too easily discouraged.
From what I can learn, the Mission has made a good beginning among the Indians, created a good influence, now I wish to have them follow it up; go and stay with them and become more and more indentified with them, until they can be brought to an understanding of our principles. It needs constant attention to improve <them & to improve> ourselves in our intercourse with them. If the brethren go amongst them, let them turn in and help the Indians in their work, and show that they feel an interest for them. Instruct them in their farming operations, and fix their tools; not only go and visit among them and then return, but remain and not be in a hurry about leaving; Stay, and become acquainted with them and their ways, and they will have more confidence in you, and your influence will be much greater over them. In this way we shall be able ultimately to control, and govern them.
As it is now, whenever an excitement arises among the Indians against the Whites, they immediately become unapproachable, and we find it difficult to get access to them at all. Now if some of our people were so well established in their confidence and friendship as to control and influence them, and more or less be with them all the time; being in their midst at such times, do you not see that all such excitements could be kept down, and we should be able through this Agency to have peace, and control all the natives, if this policy could be carried into general effect.
Praying that wisdom may be given according to your necessities, with every desirable blessing.

I Remain as ever
Your Friend & Brother

Brigham Young

Item sets

G. S. L. City July 26th, 1854.

Bros. John D. Lee, Rufus Allen,
Thos. D. Brown, & the Brethren
at Harmony.

Dear Brethren,

Your letter of the 16th inst is received, and since, Bros. Riddle, Hamblin, Hardy , &c. have arrived in 6 (1/2) days from your place.

You have doubtless received the plat of your fort before this, as I sent it to you some time since by Bro Dame.

We have some considerable clothing on hand for Indian women & children. I intended to have sent some out by the brethren when they returned from the June Conference, but they could not carry it. I intend to send it the first opportunity. It is my desire that you go ahead with your Fort and improvements, and I have no doubt but that the water will so increase that you will have plenty another year. Sow your wheat early, & it will need but little if any irrigation. Remember your canals & ditches are new and run over dry soil, and that probably absorbs the water. It is not best to be too easily discouraged.

From what I can learn, the Mission has made a good beginning among the Indians, created a good influence, now I wish to have them follow it up; go and stay with them and become more and more indentified with them, until they can be brought to an understanding of our principles. It needs constant attention to improve <them & to improve> ourselves in our intercourse with them. If the brethren go amongst them, let them turn in and help the Indians in their work, and show that they feel an interest for them. Instruct them in their farming operations, and fix their tools; not only go and visit among them and then return, but remain and not be in a hurry about leaving; Stay, and become acquainted with them and their ways, and they will have more confidence in you, and your influence will be much greater over them. In this way we shall be able ultimately to control, and govern them.

As it is now, whenever an excitement arises among the Indians against the Whites, they immediately become unapproachable, and we find it difficult to get access to them at all. Now if some of our people were so well established in their confidence and friendship as to control and influence them, and more or less be with them all the time; being in their midst at such times, do you not see that all such excitements could be kept down, and we should be able through this Agency to have peace, and control all the natives, if this policy could be carried into general effect.

Praying that wisdom may be given according to your necessities, with every desirable blessing.

I Remain as ever
Your Friend & Brother

Brigham Young