1854 July 26 Letter to D. Jones

Title

1854 July 26 Letter to D. Jones

Description

Jane's letters exaggerate the dangers in Manti and her family is well. Jones is counseled to divorce Elisabeth if he is going to be influenced by Jane to mistreat her.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

D. Jones [Dan Jones]

Date

1854 July 26

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Missionary work
Domestic Disputes
Personal
Indian Affairs

extracted text

G. S. L. City July 26th, 1854.
Bro. D. Jones.
I learn through the Star of your labor in the field of your Mission, and rejoice in the prospects which surround you of success, in winning souls to Christ.
I also learn from letters which you have written to your wife Jane, of the difficulties which you was led to beleive surrounded your family. I hope that e'er you receive this, your mind will be set at rest in regard to your family, as I understand that father Morely and Bishop Lowry have written to you upon the subject after investigating the matter. I heard nothing about it until since they wrote, but thought I would give you a few of my reflections. You are aware that I know all about your family matters. You are aware that you have often, and freely conversed with me in relation to your wife Jane and family matters. Judge then of my surprise, to see you so carried away with her tales, "have night visions and dreams of horrid murders, massacres, blood & thunder, and just as much truth in one, as in the other.
Tis true we were compelled to make the brethren at Manti, fort up as they had always been counseled to do, but had hitherto failed until last season, when by the help of the Lord, through the Agency of Captain Walker and his band of Indians, it was partially accomplished, and I hope will be finished this season.

An Elder upon a Foreign Mission, ought so to live as to know that all is right, when it so, and "not desire to have wings that he could fly 8000 Miles in an hour," to rectify & right things that are very right already. To be so influenced by Jane and goad Elisabeth is not right. I presume that in justice, a good share of the property belonged to Elisabeth, yet I have not heard of her seeking any advantage on that account. Bro Jones if you can be so influenced and carried away by Jane, I shall counsel you to give Elisabeth a Bill. I know it will be right for her to have one, and no longer be subject to being so goaded and thorned on every side. I take the privilege of talking plain to you, because I have always sought to favor and do you good. I still am, and ever expect to be your friend and brother, so long as you continue to do good, as you have in times past; but you should not be so carried away by any woman. It would not matter so much, if there were no others to suffer by it. but when there is, it makes quite a difference you know. When you write to your family, comfort them by telling them all is right, and that you have no fears, but they will be fairly dealt by, & all is well. Remember that you are upon your father's business & he will take care of you & yours.
I Remain as ever,

Your Brother in the Gospel
Brigham Young

Item sets

G. S. L. City July 26th, 1854.

Bro. D. Jones.

I learn through the Star of your labor in the field of your Mission, and rejoice in the prospects which surround you of success, in winning souls to Christ.

I also learn from letters which you have written to your wife Jane, of the difficulties which you was led to beleive surrounded your family. I hope that e'er you receive this, your mind will be set at rest in regard to your family, as I understand that father Morely and Bishop Lowry have written to you upon the subject after investigating the matter. I heard nothing about it until since they wrote, but thought I would give you a few of my reflections. You are aware that I know all about your family matters. You are aware that you have often, and freely conversed with me in relation to your wife Jane and family matters. Judge then of my surprise, to see you so carried away with her tales, "have night visions and dreams of horrid murders, massacres, blood & thunder, and just as much truth in one, as in the other.

Tis true we were compelled to make the brethren at Manti, fort up as they had always been counseled to do, but had hitherto failed until last season, when by the help of the Lord, through the Agency of Captain Walker and his band of Indians, it was partially accomplished, and I hope will be finished this season.

An Elder upon a Foreign Mission, ought so to live as to know that all is right, when it so, and "not desire to have wings that he could fly 8000 Miles in an hour," to rectify & right things that are very right already. To be so influenced by Jane and goad Elisabeth is not right. I presume that in justice, a good share of the property belonged to Elisabeth, yet I have not heard of her seeking any advantage on that account. Bro Jones if you can be so influenced and carried away by Jane, I shall counsel you to give Elisabeth a Bill. I know it will be right for her to have one, and no longer be subject to being so goaded and thorned on every side. I take the privilege of talking plain to you, because I have always sought to favor and do you good. I still am, and ever expect to be your friend and brother, so long as you continue to do good, as you have in times past; but you should not be so carried away by any woman. It would not matter so much, if there were no others to suffer by it. but when there is, it makes quite a difference you know. When you write to your family, comfort them by telling them all is right, and that you have no fears, but they will be fairly dealt by, & all is well. Remember that you are upon your father's business & he will take care of you & yours.

I Remain as ever,
Your Brother in the Gospel

Brigham Young