1854 August 2 Letter to Franklin D. Richards

Title

1854 August 2 Letter to Franklin D. Richards

Description

Brigham asks that Emigration trains do not use the Mississippi River due to illness and instructs them to forward a list of emigrants prior to their arrival in New York. He gives an update on the travel of Elders and local affairs.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Franklin D. Richards

Date

1854 August 2

Location

Great Salt Lake City
Liverpool, England

Number of Pages

3

Subject

Overland Travel
Emigration
Missionary Work
Building and Construction
Finances

extracted text

G. S. L. City, Augt. 2d. 1854.
Elder Franklin D. Richards
No. 15 Wilton St.
Liverpool, England.
Dear brother,
I have no items of very grave or special import upon which it is really necessary I should address you by this mail, still I like to keep up a monthly correspondence with you, unless prevented by mail accidents, and keep you advised of all business items and posted in general news and movements.
I have drawn a draft upon you for $21.50 in favor of thomas Houston, center of Thread Street, Paisley, Scotland, which you will please honor.
You are aware of the sickness liable to assail our unacclimated brethren on the Mississippi River, hence I wish you to ship no more to New Orleans, but ship to Philadelphia, Boston, & New York, giving preference in the order named. Whenever you ship a company, whether it be small or large be careful to forward to Elder John Taylor at New York City, a correct list of the names of the persons in each company, with their occupations and approximate amount of property, or means and forward it in season for elder John Taylor to receive it before the company arrives in port, that he may be so advised as to be able to meet them, or appoint some proper person to do so, and counsel them immediately on landing as to the best course for each and all in every company to pursue; viz, whether to tarry for a season to work in the place, or immediate neighborhood of their landing, or proceed to Cincinatti and its region &c.

In case any should still choose to ship by New Orleans, ship them from England no later than about the first of December, that they may be able to get off the rivers before the sickly season sets in, for many have died off with the cholera, and other diseases incident to the sickly season on the rivers, and I do not wish the brethren to be so exposed as they have been, and counsel them to hurry up the rivers and get off from them into Missouri & Iowa to work or on to the plains as the case may be before the warm weather sets in.
From last advices, all the elders on their way from these valleys to fill various foreign missions, were abundantly blessed and prospered in their travels, and would probably soon reach their several fields of labor. Rumor reports some sickness, and several deaths among the brethren now crossing the plains, but no specific information of their condition and movements have yet reached us and from all we can learn they are getting along usually well, but some will be rather late in arriving. Elders E. T. Benson and Bro Eldredge are on the way back to meet the train in the immediate care of Elders Orson Pratt and H. S. Eldredge, from neither of whom have we received any letters per last mail, nor since they started upon the plains.
The adobie work on the Temple Block wall will soon be completed, and much of the coping stone is cut and ready for laying; and many workmen are busily engaged laying immense blocks of stone, in the massive foundation of the Temple. The prospects are still good for an abundant general harvest, though hail, and the grasshoppers have done more or less damage to the crops and gardens; this is all right, and the kind, and wise hand dealing of the Lord, and will cause the people to be more thankful for, and careful of what remains.
General good health still continues to be enjoyed by all our settlements, and all business matters, and Indian relations remain prosperous and amicable.
Goods are arriving plentifully and a slight decline in prices has taken place, which will probably continue until most staple articles can be purchased at reasonable rates; this movement is quite favorable to those who have but little means, and is another indication of the kind providences of our Heavenly Father.
Your family is well, also the families of all elders abroad, so far as I know.
My health is generally quite good, and my feelings; praying for your prosperity and welfare in the pathway of all truth and duties, I remain, your brother in the Covenant

Brigham Young

Item sets

 

G. S. L. City, Augt. 2d. 1854.

Elder Franklin D. Richards
No. 15 Wilton St.
Liverpool, England.

Dear brother,

I have no items of very grave or special import upon which it is really necessary I should address you by this mail, still I like to keep up a monthly correspondence with you, unless prevented by mail accidents, and keep you advised of all business items and posted in general news and movements.

I have drawn a draft upon you for $21.50 in favor of thomas Houston, center of Thread Street, Paisley, Scotland, which you will please honor.

You are aware of the sickness liable to assail our unacclimated brethren on the Mississippi River, hence I wish you to ship no more to New Orleans, but ship to Philadelphia, Boston, & New York, giving preference in the order named.

Whenever you ship a company, whether it be small or large be careful to forward to Elder John Taylor at New York City, a correct list of the names of the persons in each company, with their occupations and approximate amount of property, or means and forward it in season for elder John Taylor to receive it before the company arrives in port, that he may be so advised as to be able to meet them, or appoint some proper person to do so, and counsel them immediately on landing as to the best course for each and all in every company to pursue; viz, whether to tarry for a season to work in the place, or immediate neighborhood of their landing, or proceed to Cincinatti and its region &c.

In case any should still choose to ship by New Orleans, ship them from England no later than about the first of December, that they may be able to get off the rivers before the sickly season sets in, for many have died off with the cholera, and other diseases incident to the sickly season on the rivers, and I do not wish the brethren to be so exposed as they have been, and counsel them to hurry up the rivers and get off from them into Missouri & Iowa to work or on to the plains as the case may be before the warm weather sets in.

From last advices, all the elders on their way from these valleys to fill various foreign missions, were abundantly blessed and prospered in their travels, and would probably soon reach their several fields of labor. Rumor reports some sickness, and several deaths among the brethren now crossing the plains, but no specific information of their condition and movements have yet reached us and from all we can learn they are getting along usually well, but some will be rather late in arriving. Elders E. T. Benson and Bro Eldredge are on the way back to meet the train in the immediate care of Elders Orson Pratt and H. S. Eldredge, from neither of whom have we received any letters per last mail, nor since they started upon the plains.

The adobie work on the Temple Block wall will soon be completed, and much of the coping stone is cut and ready for laying; and many workmen are busily engaged laying immense blocks of stone, in the massive foundation of the Temple. The prospects are still good for an abundant general harvest, though hail, and the grasshoppers have done more or less damage to the crops and gardens; this is all right, and the kind, and wise hand dealing of the Lord, and will cause the people to be more thankful for, and careful of what remains.

General good health still continues to be enjoyed by all our settlements, and all business matters, and Indian relations remain prosperous and amicable.

Goods are arriving plentifully and a slight decline in prices has taken place, which will probably continue until most staple articles can be purchased at reasonable rates; this movement is quite favorable to those who have but little means, and is another indication of the kind providences of our Heavenly Father.

Your family is well, also the families of all elders abroad, so far as I know.

My health is generally quite good, and my feelings; praying for your prosperity and welfare in the pathway of all truth and duties, I remain, your brother in the Covenant

Brigham Young