1854 August 19 Letter to Amasa Lyman and Charles C. Rich

Title

1854 August 19 Letter to Amasa Lyman and Charles C. Rich

Description

Instructions on receiving the immigration from Australia and donations to the emigration fund. Updates on various projects in Salt Lake, the condition of markets and Indian relations.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Amasa Lyman
Charles C. Rich

Date

1854 August 19

Location

Great Salt Lake City
San Bernardino, California

Number of Pages

4

Subject

Finances
Emigration
Emigration Fund
Building and Construction
Business Matters
Indian Affairs

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City Augt 19th, 1854.
Elders Amasa Lyman
& C. C. Rich
Sant Bernardino Cal.
Dear Brethren,
The California mail, which arrived on the 14th instant, brought two letters from you, one dated June The other July 27th. I rejoiced to hear of your welfare and movements, of the general good health of your settlement, and of your prospects for an abundant harvest
From the condition of your money market, I observe that you are somewhat cramped in making your land payments, still I perceive you keep up your courage, and doubtless, as you remark, the way will open in due time, and let you slip through easily.
On the 18th of July, I forwarded you a letter by the regular Mail, in which I detailed my views in reference to the Sandwich Island immigration, at least for the present.
With regard to the immigration from Australia both present and future, they will doubtless continue to ship to some port in California, and first come under your supervision, or that of Bro Parley, and it will probably be best for you to acquaint yourselves somewhat with their general views, feelings, & desires, and then counsel those who are to apostatize to stay there, and all who have made up their minds to be saints in very deed, and wish to continue such, may come into our settlements in Utah. This course will prevent much loss, and subsequent trouble and disappointment, as it interposes a politic strainor between the rivulets and main reservoir.
As heretofore, you will please receive donations to the Emigration Fund, and forward the same to me, or make such disposition of them from time to time, as I may suggest, keeping a correct account of your doings therein, and report as often as you see proper, that I may be the better able to direct the general application of the Fund.
Donations in Australia made expressly and judiciously to assist the poor to emigrate will be placed to their credit of the donor whenever the amount is paid into the fund. But the names of the donors and the parties to whom paid will invariably have to be forwarded to this Office without delay so that the means of the Fund may be immediately under my special Supervision. At the sametime, it appears to me to be far more just to aid the poor saints in the British Isles, where there are so few facilities for them to procure an outfit when compared with the many opportunities in Australia, and aside from this, the Australian brethren have been as yet but little tried, while many of the poor in England have been struggling for years in the depths of poverty, and longing to gather, but with no tangible prospect expect by way of the Fund. You will be able to explain the matter, to the satisfaction of the Australian donors, whose object has been good, and who will be credited with their respective amounts, whenever they are actually paid into the Fund. Were the fund very large, and the poor few, it might answer to credit them as they anticipated, but when the reverse is so signally the case, they will be able to understand the correctness and Justice of the above decision.
Brother William Hyde came in with the Mail, and his health is still poor.
The Adobie portion of the Wall around the Temple Block was completed on the 15th inst, and on the 16th I helped the workmen to lay the first Coping stone on the North west corner.

The foundation of the Temple, the building for the Sugar Machinery, and all The Public Works are under good headway, and private enterprise is rapidly adding to the beauty, size and comfort of our City, which is now abundantly supplied with imported Articles well suited to our Market; and circumstances will probably make the rates of Sale reasonable.
Wheat is selling at $1.50 pr. Bushel oats at $1.50, and cash plenty. and lest your Citizens, contrasting the relative prices and condition of our Markets should become uneasy, and wish to return here for their health, I wish you would counsel them to remain where they are, until they can be contented to settle down & remain where duty requires, or become filled with health to the utmost they can obtain, for these health seeking spirits <without> regard to counsel, are entirely two restless to aid much in rolling forth salvation.
The Indians continue friendly, the people peaceful, and industrious, the prospect for a plentiful harvast good, and we are blessed with general good health, and there is no one but ourselves to prevent our rejoicing and serving the Lord continually.
Green Flake worked for me about a year, sometime ago and when he went to Cottonwood his health was quite feeble and from all I can learn he is still unable even to support himself and family entirely; should he regain his health, so as to be able to be of any benefit to Sister Flake, I will inform you.
Your families are well, so far as I know.
You will learn the details of our doings in The News, which I presume you will now receive more regular than heretofore.
Praying for your Success in the accomplishment of every laudable object,

I Remain as ever
Your Brother in the Gospel

Brigham Young

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City Augt 19th, 1854.

Elders Amasa Lyman
& C. C. Rich

Sant Bernardino Cal.

Dear Brethren,

The California mail, which arrived on the 14th instant, brought two letters from you, one dated June The other July 27th. I rejoiced to hear of your welfare and movements, of the general good health of your settlement, and of your prospects for an abundant harvest
From the condition of your money market, I observe that you are somewhat cramped in making your land payments, still I perceive you keep up your courage, and doubtless, as you remark, the way will open in due time, and let you slip through easily.

On the 18th of July, I forwarded you a letter by the regular Mail, in which I detailed my views in reference to the Sandwich Island immigration, at least for the present.

With regard to the immigration from Australia both present and future, they will doubtless continue to ship to some port in California, and first come under your supervision, or that of Bro Parley, and it will probably be best for you to acquaint yourselves somewhat with their general views, feelings, & desires, and then counsel those who are to apostatize to stay there, and all who have made up their minds to be saints in very deed, and wish to continue such, may come into our settlements in Utah. This course will prevent much loss, and subsequent trouble and disappointment, as it interposes a politic strainor between the rivulets and main reservoir.

As heretofore, you will please receive donations to the Emigration Fund, and forward the same to me, or make such disposition of them from time to time, as I may suggest, keeping a correct account of your doings therein, and report as often as you see proper, that I may be the better able to direct the general application of the Fund.

Donations in Australia made expressly and judiciously to assist the poor to emigrate will be placed to their credit of the donor whenever the amount is paid into the fund. But the names of the donors and the parties to whom paid will invariably have to be forwarded to this Office without delay so that the means of the Fund may be immediately under my special Supervision. At the sametime, it appears to me to be far more just to aid the poor saints in the British Isles, where there are so few facilities for them to procure an outfit when compared with the many opportunities in Australia, and aside from this, the Australian brethren have been as yet but little tried, while many of the poor in England have been struggling for years in the depths of poverty, and longing to gather, but with no tangible prospect expect by way of the Fund. You will be able to explain the matter, to the satisfaction of the Australian donors, whose object has been good, and who will be credited with their respective amounts, whenever they are actually paid into the Fund. Were the fund very large, and the poor few, it might answer to credit them as they anticipated, but when the reverse is so signally the case, they will be able to understand the correctness and Justice of the above decision.

Brother William Hyde came in with the Mail, and his health is still poor.

The Adobie portion of the Wall around the Temple Block was completed on the 15th inst, and on the 16th I helped the workmen to lay the first Coping stone on the North west corner.

The foundation of the Temple, the building for the Sugar Machinery, and all The Public Works are under good headway, and private enterprise is rapidly adding to the beauty, size and comfort of our City, which is now abundantly supplied with imported Articles well suited to our Market; and circumstances will probably make the rates of Sale reasonable.

Wheat is selling at $1.50 pr. Bushel oats at $1.50, and cash plenty. and lest your Citizens, contrasting the relative prices and condition of our Markets should become uneasy, and wish to return here for their health, I wish you would counsel them to remain where they are, until they can be contented to settle down & remain where duty requires, or become filled with health to the utmost they can obtain, for these health seeking spirits <without> regard to counsel, are entirely two restless to aid much in rolling forth salvation.

The Indians continue friendly, the people peaceful, and industrious, the prospect for a plentiful harvast good, and we are blessed with general good health, and there is no one but ourselves to prevent our rejoicing and serving the Lord continually.

Green Flake worked for me about a year, sometime ago and when he went to Cottonwood his health was quite feeble and from all I can learn he is still unable even to support himself and family entirely; should he regain his health, so as to be able to be of any benefit to Sister Flake, I will inform you.

Your families are well, so far as I know.

You will learn the details of our doings in The News, which I presume you will now receive more regular than heretofore.

Praying for your Success in the accomplishment of every laudable object,

I Remain as ever
Your Brother in the Gospel

Brigham Young