1854 August 19 Letter to Parley P. Pratt

Title

1854 August 19 Letter to Parley P. Pratt

Description

Brigham concurs with the purchase of a press. He outlines plans to locate the Australian and Sandwich Islands emigrants in Southern Utah and details how credit will be given for donations to the Emigration Fund.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Parley P. Pratt

Date

1854 August 19

Location

Great Salt Lake City
Union City, California

Number of Pages

3

Subject

Indian Affairs
Emigration
Perpetual Emigration Fund

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City, Augt. 19/54
Elder Parley P. Pratt
Care of John M . Horner Esqr.
Union City, California
Dear brother,
The California mail which arrived on the 14th, inst, brought me no letter from you caused, I presume, by the Indians robbing the sacks which contained the mail matter from north of Loss Angelos, at the Resting Springs, four and a half days out from San Bernardino; the particulars are printed in the "News" over bro Wm Hyde's signature, as he was in company and arrived here with the mail though still in poor health. The purchase of a Brig, of a Printing Press, and the prob- ability of your receiving and using it I learn from bros. Lyman & Rich, and I deem the whole arrangement a good one, particularly as the press will be in a central and influential position, and can print for the islands as well, or better than if located there, which saves the expense of an additional press. I have already written to bros. Lyman & Rich concerning the Sandwich Island and Australian emigration, the purport of which I will now write to you. I advised them to appoint a delegation at their earliest convenience, instructed to proceed and examine the county from the Mohave to Iron county, consult with the Presidents of Cedar City and Harmony, and the Indians in the region named, locate some site or sites for the Islanders where they can be located among a peaceable and industrious portion of the remnants of Jacob, their brethren, and enjoy a climate as similar to their own as we can at present furnish, and be aloof from the contaminations of the white settlements of California, and within reach of proper supervision and counsel. In reference to the Australian Emigration, I have advised that they in connection with you inquire into their feelings and desires upon their arrival, and let all who are saints and wish to continue so, come into our settlements in Utah whenever they wish to, but let your locality and San Bernardino act as strainers to the reservoir here, thus preventing loss, trouble, and disappointment. Elders Lyman and Rich further informed me that many of the emigrants from Australia who came with bro Hyde were assisted by their brethren with the understanding that such donations would be placed to their credit on the books of the Emigration Fund. In reply I informed them that such wood be the case when the amount is actually paid to the Fund, and not before, as any other course would not he just to the elder and poorer brethren in the British Isles, where the facilities for procuring an outfit are far worse and fewer than they are in Australia. This deemed the wiser course until the means of the Fund bear a much larger proportion to the number of the poor to be gathered than they now do.
On the 15th inst the adobie work of the wall around the Temple Block was finished, and on the 16th I helped to raise the first coping stone to its place on the northwest corner. Our public works are progressing with goodly speed, and success, and private enterprize is doing much toward building up our beautiful city.
The hail and grasshoppers have injured our crops and gardens to a certain extent in some locations, but we have a good prospect of a plentiful harvest. The Indians continue friendly, and we are still blest with peace, prosperity, and general good health.
Your family are all well as far as I learn. Particular items of general news you will see in our paper which I presume you will receive regularly, as the carriers are quite energetic in its transportation under the new contract.
Trusting that you will write whenever you feel moved upon, which I hope will be by each mail.

I Remain, as ever,
Your brother in the Gospel.
Brigham Young

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City, Augt. 19/54

Elder Parley P. Pratt

Care of John M . Horner Esqr.
Union City, California

Dear brother,

The California mail which arrived on the 14th, inst, brought me no letter from you caused, I presume, by the Indians robbing the sacks which contained the mail matter from north of Loss Angelos, at the Resting Springs, four and a half days out from San Bernardino; the particulars are printed in the "News" over bro Wm Hyde's signature, as he was in company and arrived here with the mail though still in poor health. The purchase of a Brig, of a Printing Press, and the prob- ability of your receiving and using it I learn from bros. Lyman & Rich, and I deem the whole arrangement a good one, particularly as the press will be in a central and influential position, and can print for the islands as well, or better than if located there, which saves the expense of an additional press. I have already written to bros. Lyman & Rich concerning the Sandwich Island and Australian emigration, the purport of which I will now write to you. I advised them to appoint a delegation at their earliest convenience, instructed to proceed and examine the county from the Mohave to Iron county, consult with the Presidents of Cedar City and Harmony, and the Indians in the region named, locate some site or sites for the Islanders where they can be located among a peaceable and industrious portion of the remnants of Jacob, their brethren, and enjoy a climate as similar to their own as we can at present furnish, and be aloof from the contaminations of the white settlements of California, and within reach of proper supervision and counsel. In reference to the Australian Emigration, I have advised that they in connection with you inquire into their feelings and desires upon their arrival, and let all who are saints and wish to continue so, come into our settlements in Utah whenever they wish to, but let your locality and San Bernardino act as strainers to the reservoir here, thus preventing loss, trouble, and disappointment. Elders Lyman and Rich further informed me that many of the emigrants from Australia who came with bro Hyde were assisted by their brethren with the understanding that such donations would be placed to their credit on the books of the Emigration Fund. In reply I informed them that such wood be the case when the amount is actually paid to the Fund, and not before, as any other course would not he just to the elder and poorer brethren in the British Isles, where the facilities for procuring an outfit are far worse and fewer than they are in Australia. This deemed the wiser course until the means of the Fund bear a much larger proportion to the number of the poor to be gathered than they now do.

On the 15th inst the adobie work of the wall around the Temple Block was finished, and on the 16th I helped to raise the first coping stone to its place on the northwest corner. Our public works are progressing with goodly speed, and success, and private enterprize is doing much toward building up our beautiful city.

The hail and grasshoppers have injured our crops and gardens to a certain extent in some locations, but we have a good prospect of a plentiful harvest. The Indians continue friendly, and we are still blest with peace, prosperity, and general good health.

Your family are all well as far as I learn. Particular items of general news you will see in our paper which I presume you will receive regularly, as the carriers are quite energetic in its transportation under the new contract.

Trusting that you will write whenever you feel moved upon, which I hope will be by each mail.

I Remain, as ever,
Your brother in the Gospel.

Brigham Young