1855 January 18 Letter to S. P. Mallet

Title

1855 January 18 Letter to S. P. Mallet

Description

In regards to a report of stolen horses Young will gladly return them if the opportunity arises.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Daniel Mackintosh

Recipient

S. P. Mallet

Date

1855 January 18

Location

Great Salt Lake City
Salmon River Oregon Territory

Subject

Dispute

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City, Jany. 18th 1855.
S. P. Mallet Esq.
Salmon River Oregon Territory
Sir,

Your letter of the 23rd of December A. D. 1854, was rec. on the 16th inst, and handed to me by His Excellency Brigham Young to answer, with a request to inform you, that he is entirely unacquainted with any circumstance whatever connected with the stealing of the Horses mentioned in your letter.
There is none more particularly anxious that property stolen or lost should be placed in the possession of the rightful owner, whether Indian or white man than Governor Young, neither is there any more opposed to dishonesty and other crimes than he; yet it is not to be supposed that he can ferret out and be able to bring to justice every marauder who may in the midnight hour, seize as a prey the property of others in the absence of witnesses; but be assured, had the circumstance in question, come under his observation the property would have been cheerfully restored, and the depredator made to feel the merit of the Law, made & provided for such cases.
The citizens of this Territory have suffered much from similar circumstances, and His Excellency would be equally glad, could such property be placed in the hands of the rightful owners.
Respectfully

Danl. Mackintosh, Clerk.

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City, Jany. 18th 1855.

S. P. Mallet Esq.
Salmon River Oregon Territory

Sir,

Your letter of the 23rd of December A. D. 1854, was rec. on the 16th inst, and handed to me by His Excellency Brigham Young to answer, with a request to inform you, that he is entirely unacquainted with any circumstance whatever connected with the stealing of the Horses mentioned in your letter.

There is none more particularly anxious that property stolen or lost should be placed in the possession of the rightful owner, whether Indian or white man than Governor Young, neither is there any more opposed to dishonesty and other crimes than he; yet it is not to be supposed that he can ferret out and be able to bring to justice every marauder who may in the midnight hour, seize as a prey the property of others in the absence of witnesses; but be assured, had the circumstance in question, come under his observation the property would have been cheerfully restored, and the depredator made to feel the merit of the Law, made & provided for such cases.

The citizens of this Territory have suffered much from similar circumstances, and His Excellency would be equally glad, could such property be placed in the hands of the rightful owners.

Respectfully
Danl. Mackintosh, Clerk.