1858 February Letter to Horace S. Eldredge

Title

1858 February Letter to Horace S. Eldredge

Description

Due to disturbances from the Federal Government Brigham
counsel Eldredge and the immigration to leave for Utah as soon as possible. Upaid debt will be paid when conditions allow.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Horace S. Eldredge

Date

1858 February

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Emigration
Government
Finances
Mail

extracted text

Feby 1858
Pres. Horace S. Eldredge,
Dear Brother:-
Your letter of Novr. 14th arrived by the Cal mail on the 3 instant, and its contents caused neither surprise nor discouragement, as they corresponded with what we had anticipated from the movements of late. All circumstances considered, it will probably be best for you to at once so arrange your affairs as to be able to leave for the mountains at any moment your judgment may dictate. And should you be unable to pay off all indebtedness, inform the creditors that we have plenty of funds to pay them, but since we have no communication except by Panama, and mail matter by that route is often carefully overhauled after it leaves our borders, they must patiently wait the progress and issue of the present disturbance so wickedly caused by President Buchanan, at which they certainly cannot justly complain, since the present disturbance is entirely the fault of our enemies on account of our religion, and we are only acting in self defence. Under the present aspect of affairs, I am unable to counsel you in regard to this years immigration, any further than to say to you and all others to make your way to Utah as soon and in the best manner and by the best route you can. Our enemies have gone into winter quarters near the ruins of Fort Supply and Bridger, (which you are aware were vacated and burnt by us last fall) and for some weeks past we have not heard from them, though we are making such preparations as may be necessary for the preservation of our rights and lives. Please bring with you as much unruled paper, like the small sample enclosed, as you can conveniently. Send all your letters by way of Panama, for no letters, papers, or mails have reached here from Independence since Mr. Kimball's contract was annulled.

For explanation I enclose a copy of the account current between you and br. Groesbeck
Ever praying for your prosperity and welfare in the Kingdom of God.
I remain, as ever, your Brother in the Gospel.

Brigham Young
P. S.
Mr. Postmaster and all others:-- when you have read this letter, please forward it to its destination, for keeping it can be of no possible benefit to you.
B. Y.

Item sets

Feby 1858

Pres. Horace S. Eldredge,

Dear Brother:-
Your letter of Novr. 14th arrived by the Cal mail on the 3 instant, and its contents caused neither surprise nor discouragement, as they corresponded with what we had anticipated from the movements of late. All circumstances considered, it will probably be best for you to at once so arrange your affairs as to be able to leave for the mountains at any moment your judgment may dictate. And should you be unable to pay off all indebtedness, inform the creditors that we have plenty of funds to pay them, but since we have no communication except by Panama, and mail matter by that route is often carefully overhauled after it leaves our borders, they must patiently wait the progress and issue of the present disturbance so wickedly caused by President Buchanan, at which they certainly cannot justly complain, since the present disturbance is entirely the fault of our enemies on account of our religion, and we are only acting in self defence. Under the present aspect of affairs, I am unable to counsel you in regard to this years immigration, any further than to say to you and all others to make your way to Utah as soon and in the best manner and by the best route you can. Our enemies have gone into winter quarters near the ruins of Fort Supply and Bridger, (which you are aware were vacated and burnt by us last fall) and for some weeks past we have not heard from them, though we are making such preparations as may be necessary for the preservation of our rights and lives. Please bring with you as much unruled paper, like the small sample enclosed, as you can conveniently. Send all your letters by way of Panama, for no letters, papers, or mails have reached here from Independence since Mr. Kimball's contract was annulled.

For explanation I enclose a copy of the account current between you and br. Groesbeck
Ever praying for your prosperity and welfare in the Kingdom of God.

I remain, as ever, your Brother in the Gospel.
Brigham Young

P. S.
Mr. Postmaster and all others:-- when you have read this letter, please forward it to its destination, for keeping it can be of no possible benefit to you.

B. Y.