1858 March 18 Letter to Allen Weekes

Title

1858 March 18 Letter to Allen Weekes

Description

Brigham warns Major Weekes about a group of hostile Indians in the area and to protect settlements, cattle and horses.

Type

Correspondence
Indian Affairs

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Allen Weekes

Date

1858 March 18

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Subject

Indian Affairs
Governor's Office

extracted text

Governor's Office.
Great Salt Lake City March 18th. 1858
Major Allen Weekes
Dear Brother.
A number of lawless Indians have been committing depradations upon the herds of cattle and horses belonging to the Settlements, West and South-West. If you are not already aware, you had better awaken to the fact that not only your stock but your own lives who live in the frontier settlements are in danger while such hostile parties are prowling around, unless by constant and most active vigilance is exercised.
Let measures be taken at once to secure your cattle and horses by efficiently guarding them night and day: and gather in any of the brethren who may be in solitary or dangerous locations. Concentrate sufficiently to be able to render each other quick and effectual support in case of alarm.
Keep your horses particularly out of the reach of the Indians and where they can be on hand to mount, so as to support the guards or those who may need help. You had better keep them stabled if you can.

Your bro. in Christ,

Brigham Young

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1858 March 18 Letter to Phineas W. Cook

Governor's Office.
Great Salt Lake City March 18th. 1858 

Major Allen Weekes

Dear Brother.

A number of lawless Indians have been committing depradations upon the herds of cattle and horses belonging to the Settlements, West and SouthWest.  If you are not already aware, you had better awaken to the fact that not only your stock but your own lives who live in the frontier settlements are in danger while such hostile parties are prowling around, unless by  constant and most active vigilance is exercised.

Let measures be taken at once to secure your cattle and horses by efficiently guarding them night and day: and gather in any of the brethren who may be in solitary or dangerous locations.  Concentrate sufficiently to be able to render each other quick and effectual support in case of alarm.

Keep your horses particularly out of the reach of the Indians and where they can be on hand to mount, so as to support the guards or those who may need help.  You had better keep them stabled if you can.

Your bro. in Christ,

Brigham Young