1858 March 22 Letter to Benjamin Simons

Title

1858 March 22 Letter to Benjamin Simons

Description

Encouragement to not take sides between the soldiers and the Mormons for his safety. The people of the Church want to peacefully protect their lives and their settlements.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Benjamin Simons

Date

1858 March 22

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Settlements
Military
Disputes

extracted text

Presidents Office
Great Salt Lake City Mar 22nd 1858
Ben. Simons,
From all I have heard you say, I presume that you and those with you do not wish to take any part in the matter between the soldiers and the `Mormons'. That is good policy, for we are only desirous to protect our rights, our homes, and our wives and children, which the soldiers would gladly deprive us of, and also of our lives if they could. We do not ask you to help us, neither do we want you to help the soldiers, for which reason I think it best for you and tho with you to keep out of the way of both our men and the soldiers, and then there can be no blame attached to you by either party; and by not taking sides with either the `Mormons' or soldiers, you will be in no danger of being hurt in any way. We do not wish to harm the soldiers nor any one else, as you well know; neither do we intend to suffer the soldiers to kill us and our families, for we have done nothing worthy of such treatment. We do not expect to hurt the soldiers, unless they attempt to come into our settlements without our permission. Will you not send me word by the bearer, or by the first opportunity. what your feelings are about taking sides with either party? And if you do not wish to side with either, which I trust you do not, I want you to pledge me that you will remain neutral, whether there proves to be any fighting between us and the soldiers, or not, for we do not mean to fight them, unless we are obliged to, and we do not want the Indians to interfere on either side, but to keep out of the way.

The friend of all mankind

Brigham Young


P, S. I understand that Weber Tom, as he is called, is engaged with some other Indians in stealing cattle and horses in Rush and Scull Valleys, and if you claim any control over Weber Tom or any other Indians who are engaged in stealing animals from our herds and settlements, I wish you to at once take steps to make them behave themselves, for if they act as they are now doing we shall be compelled to chastise them until they will let our animals run safely on the range and behave themselves peaceably.

Item sets

Presidents Office

Great Salt Lake City  Mar 22nd 1858

Ben. Simons,

From all I have heard you say, I presume that you and those with you do not wish to take any part in the matter between the soldiers and the `Mormons'.  That is good policy, for we are only desirous to protect our rights, our homes, and our wives and children, which the soldiers would gladly deprive us of, and also of our lives if they could.  We do not ask you to help us, neither do we want you to help the soldiers, for which reason I think it best for you and tho with you to keep out of the way of both our men and the soldiers, and then there can be no blame attached to you by either party; and by not taking sides with either the `Mormons' or soldiers, you will be in no danger of being hurt in any way.  We do not wish to harm the soldiers nor any one else, as you well know; neither do we intend to suffer the soldiers to kill us and our families, for we have done nothing worthy of such treatment.  We do not expect to hurt the soldiers, unless they attempt to come into our settlements without our permission.  Will you not send me word by the bearer, or by the first opportunity.  what your feelings are about taking sides with either party?  And if you do not wish to side with either, which I trust you do not, I want you to pledge me that you will remain neutral, whether there proves to be any fighting between us and the soldiers, or not, for we do not mean to fight them, unless we are obliged to, and we do not want the Indians to interfere on either side, but to keep out of the way.

The friend of all mankind

Brigham Young