1858 March 9 Letter to Thomas L Kane

Title

1858 March 9 Letter to Thomas L Kane

Description

The United States Troops camped within the borders of the Utah territory are destitute of provisions. Brigham plans to send 200 head of cattle and 15-20,000 pounds of flour.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Thomas L. Kane

Date

1858 March 8

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Subject

Provisions
Charity
Military
Indian Affairs

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City, March 9. 1858.
Tuesday 8 O'clock P. M
Col. Thomas L. Kane
Dear Sir,
We have just learned through the southern Indians that the troops are very destitute of provisions.
Mr Gerrish, a Merchant formerly of this place and who is now supposed to be detained in Col. Johnson's camp has quite a herd of cattle here and for which he would doubtless, like a market. We know of none that would be equal to the Army of the United States now encamped within our borders, we have therefore concluded to send this herd consisting of near 200 yead of cattle, a portion of which are tolerable good beef. In addition to the foregoing we shall send out fifteen or twenty thousand pounds of flour to the Army to which they will be made perfectly welcome or pay for just as they choose, all of which will be forwarded in a few days so soon as the necessary arrangements can be made &c the snow will admit. If after your arrival you learn that Col. Johnson will not receive the flour, we will be obliged if you will be at the trouble of communicating the fact to those who attend you, that we may be saved the trouble.
I send this by my son Jos. A. and George S Kingham. Trusting that you are rapidly regaining your health, and that success may attend you,
I remain, most respectfully

Brigham Young

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City, March 9. 1858.
Tuesday 8 O'clock P. M

Col. Thomas L. Kane

Dear Sir,
We have just learned through the southern Indians that the troops are very destitute of provisions.

Mr Gerrish, a Merchant formerly of this place and who is now supposed to be detained in Col. Johnson's camp has quite a herd of cattle here and for which he would doubtless, like a market. We know of none that would be equal to the Army of the United States now encamped within our borders, we have therefore concluded to send this herd consisting of near 200 yead of cattle, a portion of which are tolerable good beef. In addition to the foregoing we shall send out fifteen or twenty thousand pounds of flour to the Army to which they will be made perfectly welcome or pay for just as they choose, all of which will be forwarded in a few days so soon as the necessary arrangements can be made &c the snow will admit. If after your arrival you learn that Col. Johnson will not receive the flour, we will be obliged if you will be at the trouble of communicating the fact to those who attend you, that we may be saved the trouble.

I send this by my son Jos. A. and George S Kingham. Trusting that you are rapidly regaining your health, and that success may attend you,

I remain, most respectfully
Brigham Young