1858 March 11 Letter to John L. Butler

Title

1858 March 11 Letter to John L. Butler

Description

Brigham informs Butler of his intent to send provisions to the starving Indians in the Uintah Valley.

Type

Correspondence
Indian Affairs

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

John L. Butler

Date

1858 March 11

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Subject

Indian Affairs
Charity
Relief

extracted text

President's Office,
G. S. L. City.
March 11th 1858
Bishop John L. Butler,
Dear Brother:-
Your letter of the 8th. came to hand a few hours ago, and in reply I have to inform you that I yesterday wrote to Bishop Aaron Johnson, (before knowing that any Indians wished to return from Uinta, but having learned that they were hungry), and requested him to enquire among the Indians in his neighborhood to learn whether any of them would go and take flour to the destitute Indians in Uinta, if so, to furnish them, free of cost, out of tithing wheat, what flour they would agree to faithfully carry over; and also to ask them to tell the Indians in Uinta, who were hungry and wished to come into the Settlements, that they were welcome to come in in peace, and that they should be treated in as friendly <a> manner as heretofore and will find plenty of food in our settlements.

I remain, as ever, your Brother
in the Gospel.

Brigham Young

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1858 March 10 Letter to Aaron Johnson

President's Office,

G. S. L. City.
March 11th 1858

Bishop John L. Butler,

Dear Brother:-
Your letter of the 8th. came to hand a few hours ago, and in reply I have to inform you that I yesterday wrote to Bishop Aaron Johnson, (before knowing that any Indians wished to return from Uinta, but having learned that they were hungry), and requested him to enquire among the Indians in his neighborhood to learn whether any of them would go and take flour to the destitute Indians in Uinta, if so, to furnish them, free of cost, out of tithing wheat, what flour they would agree to faithfully carry over; and also to ask them to tell the Indians in Uinta, who were hungry and wished to come into the Settlements, that they were welcome to come in in peace, and that they should be treated in as friendly <a> manner as heretofore and will find plenty of food in our settlements.

I remain, as ever, your Brother
in the Gospel.

Brigham Young