1858 May 15 Letter to Daniel H. Wells

Title

1858 May 15 Letter to Daniel H. Wells

Description

Brigham requests account balances for Public Lands. He discusses the movement of grain in case the US troops invade and he reports good progress on constructing shanties.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Daniel H. Wells

Date

1858 May 15

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Subject

Property
Security
Crops
Military

extracted text

Provo, May 15, 1858.
President Daniel H. Wells,

Dear Brother:-- If convenient, I would like to <have> the balances on the accounts of such of the Public hands as are now at work here.
Three of the doors sent here are too long and two narrow for the plank shanties, the doors should be 6 feet high and 2 feet and 6, or 7, or 8 inches <wide> long. Continue forwarding the wheat and flour, as it is still intended to utterly lay waste, in case the army starts to come in.
The outside of my <our> row of shanties is extended to the North East corner of the square and the workmen are busily occupied in finishing their enclosing and completion. Brs Feramorz, Charles and Ephraim are also making good progress with their shanties. Bro. Heber is busily engaged in erecting shelters at the grove, for a part of his family. Yesterday, p. m. his health is pretty good, but I have not seen <him> to day, it being so windy that I have not stirred out much, except to the Historian's Office. Say to br. Elias Smith that it is probably best to pack up the bindery at once, and be forwarding the [---] to this place, where it can be further disposed of as circumstances may require. All is well.
Your Brother in the Gospel,

Brigham Young

Item sets

Provo, May 15, 1858.

President Daniel H. Wells,

Dear Brother:-- If convenient, I would like to <have> the balances on the accounts of such of the Public hands as are now at work here.

Three of the doors sent here are too long and two narrow for the plank shanties, the doors should be 6 feet high and 2 feet and 6, or 7, or 8 inches <wide> long. Continue forwarding the wheat and flour, as it is still intended to utterly lay waste, in case the army starts to come in.

The outside of my <our> row of shanties is extended to the North East corner of the square and the workmen are busily occupied in finishing their enclosing and completion. Brs Feramorz, Charles and Ephraim are also making good progress with their shanties. Bro. Heber is busily engaged in erecting shelters at the grove, for a part of his family. Yesterday, p. m. his health is pretty good, but I have not seen <him> to day, it being so windy that I have not stirred out much, except to the Historian's Office. Say to br. Elias Smith that it is probably best to pack up the bindery at once, and be forwarding the [---] to this place, where it can be further disposed of as circumstances may require. All is well.

Your Brother in the Gospel,

Brigham Young