1858 April 28 Letter to George W. Bean

Title

1858 April 28 Letter to George W. Bean

Description

Instructions to explore south and southwest to find locations for new settlements.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

George W. Bean

Date

1858 April 28

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Settlements
Exploration

extracted text

President's Office
G. S. L. City April 28th. 1858.
Geo. W. Bean
Dear Brother:
Your note asking for instructions just came to hand. You need not look North or North west with a view to making settlements, but extend your explorations south west and south. We do not contemplate sending families across the Desert this spring hence you need not hurry to send us word but send in every opportunity by those who may be coming back. The brethren had better make such improvements as they can to make themselves comfortable at the places they locate. We do not expect you to find large extensive tracts of arable land desirable for settlements or cultivation, as the world would esteem it but rather places where nothing can be raised of consequence and exceedingly difficult of access good places for hiding up where there is absolutely no chance to obtain subsistence by the ordinary exertions of men let brother Edson Barney remain as president of the mission.
If it does not storm I expect to be in Provo on friday and may see you but if I do not go in peace and may the Lord bless and preserve you with all the brethren engaged with you in seeking out hiding places for the saints.

I remain your brother in the Gospel.

Brigham Young

Item sets

President's Office
G. S. L. City  April 28th. 1858.
Geo. W. Bean

Dear Brother:

Your note asking for instructions just came to hand.  You need not look North or North west with a view to making settlements, but extend your explorations south west and south.  We do not contemplate sending families across the Desert this spring hence you need not hurry to send us word but send in every opportunity by those who may be coming back.  The brethren had better make such improvements as they can to make themselves comfortable at the places they locate.  We do not expect you to find large extensive tracts of arable land desirable for settlements or cultivation, as the world would esteem it but rather places where nothing can be raised of consequence and exceedingly difficult of access  good places for hiding up where there is absolutely no chance to obtain subsistence by the ordinary exertions of men let brother Edson Barney remain as president of the mission.

If it does not storm I expect to be in Provo on friday and may see you but if I do not  go in peace and may the Lord bless and preserve you with all the brethren engaged with you in seeking out hiding places for the saints.

I remain your brother in the Gospel.

Brigham Young