1858 May 23 Letter from Daniel H. Wells

Title

1858 May 23 Letter from Daniel H. Wells

Description

The Bank and Tithing Office accounts are forwarded. Wells considers stopping trade with Ben Simons as it tends to depreciate the currency. The wheat barn and the church office will be moved to Provo. Wells asks questions about currency and the relocation and protection of church property.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Daniel H Wells

Recipient

Brigham Young

Date

1858 May 23

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

4

Subject

Finances
Livestock
Military
Property

extracted text

G. S. L. City, May 23rd. 1858
President Brigham Young,
Dear Brother:-- Yours of the 20th. inst. per Lewis Robison is received, and I will cheerfully comply with the instructions therein given. I should have stated in a former letter that we not only preserve your letters as you suggest, but have copied them in the letter book-- they copy very well, especially when written in heavy hand.
I should also have previously stated, that Gov. Cumming's letter was forwarded to you, which, I trust, you have received. I did not open it as I was made pretty well aware of its contents by Col. Kane.
The accounts filed by Brother Samuel were only accounts against private Individuals in favor of the Liverpool office, we presume, sent here for collection, and a few publishing Accounts current. I enclose the Bank and Tithing Office accounts, as mentioned in my last, and also a statement of wheat and flour forwarded to Provo during the last week. You will observe that the Tithing Office account is running considerable ahead of the amount of specie deposited. The amount paid the public hands has been in lieu of orders to the stores and to settle balances we owed them upon settlement made about the first of April. You will notice that over half of the entire amount of that item was paid out during that and the previous week.
The schedules are quite full and will explain themselves. I had some thoughts of stopping this Ben Simon's trade, as it has rather a tendency to depreciate the currency; those having the currency cannot get any thing he brings in with it, and frequently offer to sell it for a discount to get specie. I considered that the articles he brought, being only a few staple goods much needed, would be an accommodation, and that it would not in any case amount to much -- not enough to effect any thing -- but a good many who are much in want of domestic, hickory, shirting, calico, cotton yarn, tobacco, tea and coffee, will sell anything they have got, and not unfrequently apply to the office to get the specie for paper, to enable them to get such articles. I do not know as the evil will extend very far, as he takes butter, eggs, cheese and bacon, and pays the specie, or goods; but he is expected in soon, and I thought before he went out again I would like your suggestions upon the subject. The Currency has been offered quite freely during the week for 75 cents in specie on the dollar, and Ben is rather increasing his purchases: his invoice the last trip exceeded $1200., and I presume will more than double that amount this time. He sells cotton yarn at $4.00 per bunch; calico 35 to 40, hickory 40 a yard; tea $2.50, coffee 60 p lb., and tobacco $1.25 p plug.
We have emptied the Wheat binn north of the Barn, and commenced taking it down preparatory to moving; it will be ready as advised in my last.
Hiram sends his family in part in the morning. Brother Truman O. Angell will also leave with his family; and I believe Bro. Joseph Young. Brother Feramorz said you wished to have the office moved this week, which we shall do if we can -- as you are aware it takes considerable team to do the milling at the rate of six hundred bushels of wheat per day-- this may hinder us some, but I do think it far more appropriate to have the office at Provo now, and shall use every endeavor to have it and the clerks removed this week.
I shall also feel gratified to have some place near by you to come to, when it shall be proper for me to leave here. Louisa said that you had rooms for me or Hiram; as one of his wives is near being sick we thought it best for them to go first. Feramorz says that more shanties will be done this week, but any place will do where I can forward the remainder of my family, either this week or next, or whenever it will be most convenient.

As you directed I wrote a note <several weeks ago> to Bro. McLelland at Payson in regard to a place for church stock, but have received no answer. Briant has not yet removed any of his family or things, and does not know where to move to until it shall be decided about the place for the stock. Perhaps Bro. Mc.Lelland has made known his mind to you in regard to the matter. Briant would commence making arrangements immediately if he knew where to go. It appears necessary that corrals should be made before the stock is removed.
Adam and Joseph Sharp have just arrived and will load to-morrow, and leave next day. I think I shall send a portion of the wheat binn by their train.
The amount of Col. Kane's Drafts in favor of Brother Hooper is $1200. The amount of specie delivered to us by Wm. H. Kimball is $848.45. Shall we pay brother Hooper this specie and the remainder in currency; all in specie; or put the specie in the Bank, and pay him all in currency? He furnished the entire amount in specie to the Col..

One word in regard to the detail:-- a great share of the Brethren, especially North of the City, and I regret to add that the same spirit is too prevalent <here>, seem determined to let their property take care of itself. There is at this time not over a dozen men in Box Elder County, out of one hundred detailed; there are only about 70 out of 250 detailed in Ogden city. The Brethren south have been visited and solicited to send men to take care of the property and only four or five have responded to the call. Here in this city less than a hundred attend roll call, and more or less of them stay away when they think there is any danger of their being detailed for guard service -- for instance, Brother Farnham is on the detail says that he will not stay, neither will employ anybody to look after his property. You are acquainted with his property and know that it is worth preserving. I only mention this as an instance among many others, only the owners have actually gone.
On man in Echo (Brother Ferguson will tell you his name) left his post while on guard, and was found in the Camp of the apostates, taken and sent in. We have not felt to Court martial men who have been detailed for the Settlements, but it would seem as tho' something should be done. A word from you how we should proceed in such cases, and whether we should try to keep up the guards North. I actually do not feel it safe for those who do remain to have so few as there <are> in Box Elder Co. The families are all out from Box Elder Co. and of Weber except one which will brought away this week. The grain growing North as in other places is said to look exceedingly well, never better.
I remain as ever, Your Brother in the Gospel.
Daniel H Wells

G. S. L. City, May 23rd. 1858

President Brigham Young,

Dear Brother:-- Yours of the 20th. inst. per Lewis Robison is received, and I will cheerfully comply with the instructions therein given. I should have stated in a former letter that we not only preserve your letters as you suggest, but have copied them in the letter book-- they copy very well, especially when written in heavy hand.
I should also have previously stated, that Gov. Cumming's letter was forwarded to you, which, I trust, you have received. I did not open it as I was made pretty well aware of its contents by Col. Kane.

The accounts filed by Brother Samuel were only accounts against private Individuals in favor of the Liverpool office, we presume, sent here for collection, and a few publishing Accounts current. I enclose the Bank and Tithing Office accounts, as mentioned in my last, and also a statement of wheat and flour forwarded to Provo during the last week. You will observe that the Tithing Office account is running considerable ahead of the amount of specie deposited. The amount paid the public hands has been in lieu of orders to the stores and to settle balances we owed them upon settlement made about the first of April. You will notice that over half of the entire amount of that item was paid out during that and the previous week.

The schedules are quite full and will explain themselves. I had some thoughts of stopping this Ben Simon's trade, as it has rather a tendency to depreciate the currency; those having the currency cannot get any thing he brings in with it, and frequently offer to sell it for a discount to get specie. I considered that the articles he brought, being only a few staple goods much needed, would be an accommodation, and that it would not in any case amount to much -- not enough to effect any thing -- but a good many who are much in want of domestic, hickory, shirting, calico, cotton yarn, tobacco, tea and coffee, will sell anything they have got, and not unfrequently apply to the office to get the specie for paper, to enable them to get such articles. I do not know as the evil will extend very far, as he takes butter, eggs, cheese and bacon, and pays the specie, or goods; but he is expected in soon, and I thought before he went out again I would like your suggestions upon the subject. The Currency has been offered quite freely during the week for 75 cents in specie on the dollar, and Ben is rather increasing his purchases: his invoice the last trip exceeded $1200., and I presume will more than double that amount this time. He sells cotton yarn at $4.00 per bunch; calico 35 to 40, hickory 40 a yard; tea $2.50, coffee 60 p lb., and tobacco $1.25 p plug.

We have emptied the Wheat binn north of the Barn, and commenced taking it down preparatory to moving; it will be ready as advised in my last.

Hiram sends his family in part in the morning. Brother Truman O. Angell will also leave with his family; and I believe Bro. Joseph Young. Brother Feramorz said you wished to have the office moved this week, which we shall do if we can -- as you are aware it takes considerable team to do the milling at the rate of six hundred bushels of wheat per day-- this may hinder us some, but I do think it far more appropriate to have the office at Provo now, and shall use every endeavor to have it and the clerks removed this week.

I shall also feel gratified to have some place near by you to come to, when it shall be proper for me to leave here. Louisa said that you had rooms for me or Hiram; as one of his wives is near being sick we thought it best for them to go first. Feramorz says that more shanties will be done this week, but any place will do where I can forward the remainder of my family, either this week or next, or whenever it will be most convenient.

As you directed I wrote a note <several weeks ago> to Bro. McLelland at Payson in regard to a place for church stock, but have received no answer. Briant has not yet removed any of his family or things, and does not know where to move to until it shall be decided about the place for the stock. Perhaps Bro. Mc.Lelland has made known his mind to you in regard to the matter. Briant would commence making arrangements immediately if he knew where to go. It appears necessary that corrals should be made before the stock is removed.

Adam and Joseph Sharp have just arrived and will load to-morrow, and leave next day. I think I shall send a portion of the wheat binn by their train.

The amount of Col. Kane's Drafts in favor of Brother Hooper is $1200. The amount of specie delivered to us by Wm. H. Kimball is $848.45. Shall we pay brother Hooper this specie and the remainder in currency; all in specie; or put the specie in the Bank, and pay him all in currency? He furnished the entire amount in specie to the Col..

One word in regard to the detail:-- a great share of the Brethren, especially North of the City, and I regret to add that the same spirit is too prevalent <here>, seem determined to let their property take care of itself. There is at this time not over a dozen men in Box Elder County, out of one hundred detailed; there are only about 70 out of 250 detailed in Ogden city. The Brethren south have been visited and solicited to send men to take care of the property and only four or five have responded to the call. Here in this city less than a hundred attend roll call, and more or less of them stay away when they think there is any danger of their being detailed for guard service -- for instance, Brother Farnham is on the detail says that he will not stay, neither will employ anybody to look after his property. You are acquainted with his property and know that it is worth preserving. I only mention this as an instance among many others, only the owners have actually gone.

On man in Echo (Brother Ferguson will tell you his name) left his post while on guard, and was found in the Camp of the apostates, taken and sent in. We have not felt to Court martial men who have been detailed for the Settlements, but it would seem as tho' something should be done. A word from you how we should proceed in such cases, and whether we should try to keep up the guards North. I actually do not feel it safe for those who do remain to have so few as there <are> in Box Elder Co. The families are all out from Box Elder Co. and of Weber except one which will brought away this week. The grain growing North as in other places is said to look exceedingly well, never better.

I remain as ever, Your Brother in the Gospel.

Daniel H Wells
 

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