1858 May 8 Letter to Thomas L. Kane

Title

1858 May 8 Letter to Thomas L. Kane

Description

Brigham asks Col. Kane, his friend of many years, for permission to speak to him candidly about faith and religious beliefs.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Thomas L. Kane

Date

1858 May 8

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Personal
Missionary Work

extracted text

G. S. L. City, May 8th 1858.
For your own eye.
My Dear and Tried Friend: -
Though our acquaintance from its commencement, which now dates from many years past, has ever been marked by that frank interchange of views and feelings which should ever characterize the communications of those who have the welfare of mankind at heart, irrespective of sect or party, as I am well assured by a long and intimate acquaintance, is a feeling signally shared by yourself in common with your best friends; yet, so far as I can call to mind, I do not remember to have ever, either in correspondence, or in familiar conversation, except, perhaps, by a casual and unpursued remark, alluded to matters of religious belief, as entertained by myself and others who are commonly called "Mormons", nor do I remember that you have ever overstepped the most guarded reserve on this subject in all your communications with me. So invariably and persistently has this peculiarity marked our friendly and free interchange of views, upon policy and general topics, that I have at times imagined, and still am prone to imagine, that you are more or less inclined to scepticism even upon many points commonly received by the religious world.

The faith embraced by the Latter Day Saints is so naturally philosophical, and so consistent with and enforcive of every valuable and true principle that should govern in every department of life, that I am strongly of opinion that a plain, candid exposition of the faith of the everlasting gospel, which I have so much at heart,can not, probably, fail to at least interest a person of your reflective turn of mind. Such being my conviction, your permission to me to converse familiarly with you upon a subject of so much import, previous to your departure for your home, or to write to you upon your return to the society of your family and friends, will confer a highly esteemed favor upon, most truly
Your Friend and the Friend of all good and honorable men,
Brigham Young
Col. Thomas L. Kane.

Item sets

G. S. L. City, May 8th 1858.

For your own eye.

My Dear and Tried Friend: 

Though our acquaintance from its commencement, which now dates from many years past, has ever been marked by that frank interchange of views and feelings which should ever characterize the communications of those who have the welfare of mankind at heart, irrespective of sect or party, as I am well assured by a long and intimate acquaintance, is a feeling signally shared by yourself in common with your best friends; yet, so far as I can call to mind, I do not remember to have ever, either in correspondence, or in familiar conversation, except, perhaps, by a casual and unpursued remark, alluded to matters of religious belief, as entertained by myself and others who are commonly called "Mormons", nor do I remember that you have ever overstepped the most guarded reserve on this subject in all your communications with me.  So invariably and persistently has this peculiarity marked our friendly and free interchange of views, upon policy and general topics, that I have at times imagined, and still am prone to imagine, that you are more or less inclined to scepticism even upon many points commonly received by the religious world.

The faith embraced by the Latter Day Saints is so naturally philosophical, and so consistent with and enforcive of every valuable and true principle that should govern in every department of life, that I am strongly of opinion that a plain, candid exposition of the faith of the everlasting gospel, which I have so much at heart,can not, probably, fail to at least interest a person of your reflective turn of mind.  Such being my conviction, your permission to me to converse familiarly with you upon a subject of so much import, previous to your departure for your home, or to write to you upon your return to the society of your family and friends, will confer a highly esteemed favor upon, most truly

Your Friend and the Friend of all good and honorable men,

Brigham Young

Col. Thomas L. Kane.