1858 May 13 Letter to Isaac C. Haight

Title

1858 May 13 Letter to Isaac C. Haight

Description

Brigham will send Sugar cane seed and is pleased with Haight's iron project. He supports the arrest of Indians who steal. It appears Buchanan is determined to prosecute his crusade against the Saints.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Isaac C. Haight

Date

1858 May 13

Location

Provo U. T.

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Business Matters
Indian Affairs
Government
Military

extracted text

Provo, May 13, 1858
President I. C. Haight,
Dear Brother:-- Your letter of the 4th inst. is at hand, and I reply by the first return mail, as you request
I will forward you more sugar cane seed, as soon as it arrives from G. S. La. City, and can <probably> furnish you all you may need. I am much pleased with your perseverance and present plan projects for making iron, and trust that you will prepare a sufficient quantity of tha the different materials necessary for giving your experiment a fair trial.
I entirely approve of your <view of policy for> suggestion for putting Indian Enos <in irons> and all <other> Indians who persist in disturbing the peace or stealing the property of the whites, or inciting others to do so, whenever they can be taken and <fully> convicted of such outrageous conduct.
The southern movement is progressing prosperously and as rapidly as circumstances will permit, and bur few f appear to be <unwilling> unable to cheerfully acquiesce therein, or unable to discern and acknowledge the hand of the Lord in this as in all his providences in behalf of his cause and people upon the earth.
Brs. Samuel W. Richards, George G. Snyder, and John Y. Green arrived in G. S. L. City, on the <p. m.> 10th inst., and reached here at 2 a.m. of the 11th. They left Florence (Winter Quarters) on the 3rd of April in company with brs. Jeter Clinton, John M. W[-] Lorenzo N Hatch and John W. Tanner, whom they parted with at the lower crossing of sweetwater, all getting along well, and a small party has gone out to meet Dr. Clinton and company. The few papers, and clippings and items of news brought by br. Samuel clearly indicates that President Buchanan is was still determined no doubt to prosecute his crusade against truth and its followers to the full extent that may be in his power. Col. Johnston and command remain at at their winter quarters. One day they report plenty of provisions in camp, and <on> the morrow there are none to be had; the traders in camp also say there is plenty of flour, but they cannot get any. Gov. Cumming and <came in with> Col. Kane, and thus far he has conducted himself with as much <or more> propriety as than could have been anticipated.
In the <(Council Bluffs)> Bugle of april 30, how correctly we know not, it is reported that the House of Representatives had passed a bill for raising five regiments of volunteers, and that the Senate had passed the L Compton Bill. All is well.
Your brother in the Gospel

P. S. Since writing the above I have learned that my sugar cane seed is here, and I will forward you by this mail enough to plant fifteen acres. I wish you to retain of this same <sufficient> seed sufficient for planting ten acres, and forward the remainder to br. Joseph Horne, Heberville.

Item sets

Provo, May 13, 1858

President I. C. Haight,

Dear Brother:-- Your letter of the 4th inst. is at hand, and I reply by the first return mail, as you request

I will forward you more sugar cane seed, as soon as it arrives from G. S. La. City, and can <probably> furnish you all you may need. I am much pleased with your perseverance and present plan projects for making iron, and trust that you will prepare a sufficient quantity of tha the different materials necessary for giving your experiment a fair trial.

I entirely approve of your <view of policy for> suggestion for putting Indian Enos <in irons> and all <other> Indians who persist in disturbing the peace or stealing the property of the whites, or inciting others to do so, whenever they can be taken and <fully> convicted of such outrageous conduct.

The southern movement is progressing prosperously and as rapidly as circumstances will permit, and bur few f appear to be <unwilling> unable to cheerfully acquiesce therein, or unable to discern and acknowledge the hand of the Lord in this as in all his providences in behalf of his cause and people upon the earth.

Brs. Samuel W. Richards, George G. Snyder, and John Y. Green arrived in G. S. L. City, on the <p. m.> 10th inst., and reached here at 2 a.m. of the 11th. They left Florence (Winter Quarters) on the 3rd of April in company with brs. Jeter Clinton, John M. W[-] Lorenzo N Hatch and John W. Tanner, whom they parted with at the lower crossing of sweetwater, all getting along well, and a small party has gone out to meet Dr. Clinton and company. The few papers, and clippings and items of news brought by br. Samuel clearly indicates that President Buchanan is was still determined no doubt to prosecute his crusade against truth and its followers to the full extent that may be in his power. Col. Johnston and command remain at at their winter quarters. One day they report plenty of provisions in camp, and <on> the morrow there are none to be had; the traders in camp also say there is plenty of flour, but they cannot get any. Gov. Cumming and <came in with> Col. Kane, and thus far he has conducted himself with as much <or more> propriety as than could have been anticipated.

In the <(Council Bluffs)> Bugle of april 30, how correctly we know not, it is reported that the House of Representatives had passed a bill for raising five regiments of volunteers, and that the Senate had passed the L Compton Bill. All is well.

Your brother in the Gospel

P. S. Since writing the above I have learned that my sugar cane seed is here, and I will forward you by this mail enough to plant fifteen acres. I wish you to retain of this same <sufficient> seed sufficient for planting ten acres, and forward the remainder to br. Joseph Horne, Heberville.