1858 June 18 Letter to Alfred Cumming

Title

1858 June 18 Letter to Alfred Cumming

Description

A petition that the Governor use his Executive power to protect the rights of the citizens by preventing the marching or camping of troops in meadows, grazing lands, fields and gardens.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Alfred Cumming

Date

1858 June 18

Location

Provo

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Military
Government
Property

extracted text

Provo, June 18, 1858
Sir:--
Since the Commissioners, Ex-Governor Powell and Major McCulloch, disclaim any control, except advisory, over the movements and acts of Gen'l Johnston and his command; and since it is well understood by all that the passing and camping of those troops through and in close proximity to our settlements unavoidably cause a great destruction of property, particularly should they camp immediately west of the river Jordan, so near our chief City, we trust, --- in the exercise of the high functions of your office, for the welfare both of the people, whose Chief Executive you are, and of the Government whose general interests in Utah are confided to your oversight, that you will exercise your power and influence with Gen'l Johnston to take such a course both in march and camping, with the troops under his command that, in accordance with his Proclamation of June 14th "no person "whatever will be in any wise interfered with or molested in his person or rights"
Commissioners Powell and McCulloch have publicly declared all `difficulties' settled, and the people of Utah, in accordance with the happy admustment of past, have withdrawn all opposition to the movement of United States' troops, so they but move within the inhibitions of the Constitution and respective of the person, rights and property of all, and now the courtesy we expect from so high toned and gallant a soldier as Gen'l Johnston is said to be, to say nothing of a mutual and gentlemanly understanding, would firmly enjoin upon Gen'l Johnston and his command a line of conduct the most strictly in accordance with the Constitution and laws of our common country and the laws of this Territory, and every way becoming the army of a "great, free and enlightened Nation."

Governor, I have offered these suggestions in all frankness and candor, confidently trusting that you, in common with myself and all loyal and good citizens, will use every precaution in your power, both as a citizen and our Chief Magistrate, to prevent any collision between the citizens and the army, and to carefully guard against everything that may give rise to such collision, lest the happy results just budding from an `amicable and honorable' agreement be nipped by conduct that will cause every lover of our Republic to mourn for rights and liberty trampled in the mire.
Since the `adjustment of difficulties,' many citizens wish to return to the care of their fields and property, so soon as it may be prudent so to do; but if their meadows, grazing lands, fields, gardens &c., be laid waste by the marching <and camping> of troops, it is obvious that they can have to say the least, but little desire to return to homes desecrated by those who profess and have agreed to abide that usage which alone comports with the high character which should mark every person claiming to be an American Citizen, whether civilian or soldier.
I have the high honor, Governor to remain,
most respectfully Your Obt Serv't.

(signed) Brigham Young

His Excellency A. Cumming
Governor of Utah Territory.

Item sets

Provo, June 18, 1858

Sir:--

Since the Commissioners, Ex-Governor Powell and Major McCulloch, disclaim any control, except advisory, over the movements and acts of Gen'l Johnston and his command; and since it is well understood by all that the passing and camping of those troops through and in close proximity to our settlements unavoidably cause a great destruction of property, particularly should they camp immediately west of the river Jordan, so near our chief City, we trust, --- in the exercise of the high functions of your office, for the welfare both of the people, whose Chief Executive you are, and of the Government whose general interests in Utah are confided to your oversight, that you will exercise your power and influence with Gen'l Johnston to take such a course both in march and camping, with the troops under his command that, in accordance with his Proclamation of June 14th "no person "whatever will be in any wise interfered with or molested in his person or rights"

Commissioners Powell and McCulloch have publicly declared all `difficulties' settled, and the people of Utah, in accordance with the happy admustment of past, have withdrawn all opposition to the movement of United States' troops, so they but move within the inhibitions of the Constitution and respective of the person, rights and property of all, and now the courtesy we expect from so high toned and gallant a soldier as Gen'l Johnston is said to be, to say nothing of a mutual and gentlemanly understanding, would firmly enjoin upon Gen'l Johnston and his command a line of conduct the most strictly in accordance with the Constitution and laws of our common country and the laws of this Territory, and every way becoming the army of a "great, free and enlightened Nation."

Governor, I have offered these suggestions in all frankness and candor, confidently trusting that you, in common with myself and all loyal and good citizens, will use every precaution in your power, both as a citizen and our Chief Magistrate, to prevent any collision between the citizens and the army, and to carefully guard against everything that may give rise to such collision, lest the happy results just budding from an `amicable and honorable' agreement be nipped by conduct that will cause every lover of our Republic to mourn for rights and liberty trampled in the mire.

Since the `adjustment of difficulties,' many citizens wish to return to the care of their fields and property, so soon as it may be prudent so to do; but if their meadows, grazing lands, fields, gardens &c., be laid waste by the marching <and camping> of troops, it is obvious that they can have to say the least, but little desire to return to homes desecrated by those who profess and have agreed to abide that usage which alone comports with the high character which should mark every person claiming to be an American Citizen, whether civilian or soldier.
I have the high honor, Governor to remain,
most respectfully Your Obt Serv't.

(signed) Brigham Young

His Excellency A. Cumming
Governor of Utah Territory.