1858 June 19 Letter to Alfred Cumming

Title

1858 June 19 Letter to Alfred Cumming

Description

A plea for the Governor to prevent large encampments of troops near the settlements as it will provoke a collision and destroy grazing lands, fields and gardens.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Alfred Cumming

Date

1858 June 19

Location

Provo

Number of Pages

3

Subject

Governor's Office
Military
Property

extracted text

Provo June 19th. 1858.
Sir
Your favor of the 17th. inst. with accompanying memoranda reached me by the hands of Genl. Grant and Col. Burton yesterday, for which please accept my thanks.

During the term of my executive administration in the Territory I considered it my duty to forbid the entrance of Troops into our settlements looking upon it as an infringment of the peoples rights. However true it is that the peace has been publicly declared by Commissioners appointed by the President of the United States, which your own straight forward constitutional course, aided by the praiseworthy exertions of our mutual and excellent friend Col. Thos. L. Kane, had already nearly consummated. Yet the recent date of that announcement and the embittered feelings which it is well known have existed for some time past with the unwise and uninformed make it equally apparent that the close proximity of encampments of Troops near our settlements instead of extending the amicable relations which we are all anxious to establish would rather tend to create difficulties if not provoke a collision. For these reasons do the people of the Territory rely upon you to exercise not only your extensive personal influence but your unquestioned Gubernatorial authority to prevent the encampment of any large body of troops even temporarily in any place to infringe upon the grazing lands, fields, or gardens of the citizens. By this course I think you will see at once that the best interests of the General and Territorial Governments will be the most fully subserved, I am aware that your position is a most difficult one, for transpiring events lead me to believe that the arrival and movements of the Commissioners instead of aiding you in the legitimate and peaceful discharge of your official duties have rather been calculated to embarrass and perplex your position through the advance upon their arrival of Genl. Johnston some two weeks previous to the time of his pledge. Indeed their only apparent business here was to ask permission for the troops to pass through this as through other Territories, to constitutionally establish certain posts that might be deemed necessary for the protection of Emigration (to neither of which had any objections ever been made) and to ask the people to accept the proffered pardon of Prest. Buchanan.
Permit me to assure you, Governor that any service you may at any time need in the constitutional discharge of your official duties will be always most promptly accorded and to the fullest extent; but it cannot reasonably be expected that the people will return to their deserted homes, while large bodies of troops are camped in their immediate suburbs.
Trusting that you may enjoy in time to come, the happy satisfaction of having fully and successfully, accomplished your important and embarrassing mission, and enjoy the rewards of your labors in peace.
I have the honor to remain Most respectfully

Yr obt Servant

(signed) Brigham Young
His
Excellency A. Cumming
Govr of Utah Territory

P. S. Mr. F Little who accompanies Genl. Ferguson to the city will see Mr. Ficklin concerning contracts for hay, wood, Lumber &c. for the Army. Any assistance you can render Genl. Ferguson in obtaining signatures from your friends to the petition which he bears with him as well as your own signature would be esteemed as a favor.

(Signed) B. Y.

To his Excellency Govr A Cumming

Item sets

Provo June 19th. 1858.

Sir
Your favor of the 17th. inst. with accompanying memoranda reached me by the hands of Genl. Grant and Col. Burton yesterday, for which please accept my thanks.

During the term of my executive administration in the Territory I considered it my duty to forbid the entrance of Troops into our settlements looking upon it as an infringment of the peoples rights. However true it is that the peace has been publicly declared by Commissioners appointed by the President of the United States, which your own straight forward constitutional course, aided by the praiseworthy exertions of our mutual and excellent friend Col. Thos. L. Kane, had already nearly consummated. Yet the recent date of that announcement and the embittered feelings which it is well known have existed for some time past with the unwise and uninformed make it equally apparent that the close proximity of encampments of Troops near our settlements instead of extending the amicable relations which we are all anxious to establish would rather tend to create difficulties if not provoke a collision. For these reasons do the people of the Territory rely upon you to exercise not only your extensive personal influence but your unquestioned Gubernatorial authority to prevent the encampment of any large body of troops even temporarily in any place to infringe upon the grazing lands, fields, or gardens of the citizens. By this course I think you will see at once that the best interests of the General and Territorial Governments will be the most fully subserved, I am aware that your position is a most difficult one, for transpiring events lead me to believe that the arrival and movements of the Commissioners instead of aiding you in the legitimate and peaceful discharge of your official duties have rather been calculated to embarrass and perplex your position through the advance upon their arrival of Genl. Johnston some two weeks previous to the time of his pledge. Indeed their only apparent business here was to ask permission for the troops to pass through this as through other Territories, to constitutionally establish certain posts that might be deemed necessary for the protection of Emigration (to neither of which had any objections ever been made) and to ask the people to accept the proffered pardon of Prest. Buchanan.

Permit me to assure you, Governor that any service you may at any time need in the constitutional discharge of your official duties will be always most promptly accorded and to the fullest extent; but it cannot reasonably be expected that the people will return to their deserted homes, while large bodies of troops are camped in their immediate suburbs.
Trusting that you may enjoy in time to come, the happy satisfaction of having fully and successfully, accomplished your important and embarrassing mission, and enjoy the rewards of your labors in peace.

I have the honor to remain Most respectfully
Yr obt Servant

(signed) Brigham Young

His Excellency A. Cumming
Govr of Utah Territory

P. S. Mr. F Little who accompanies Genl. Ferguson to the city will see Mr. Ficklin concerning contracts for hay, wood, Lumber &c. for the Army. Any assistance you can render Genl. Ferguson in obtaining signatures from your friends to the petition which he bears with him as well as your own signature would be esteemed as a favor.

(Signed) B. Y.

To his Excellency Govr A Cumming