1858 June 22 Letter to Arrowpeen [Arrowpin]

Title

1858 June 22 Letter to Arrowpeen [Arrowpin]

Description

Brigham sends the chief supplies, updates him on the plans of the Military and praises him for his crops.

Type

Correspondence
Indian Affairs

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Arrowpeen [Arrowpin]

Date

1858 June 22

Location

Provo

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Military
Indian Affairs

extracted text

Provo, June 22nd. 1858
Arrowpeen, Chief of the Utahs,
I send you 2 pounds of sugar, 1 pound of coffee, and a plug of tobacco. Brother Snow will let you have a little powder and lead.
The President has sent two Men from Washington to ask us to let the soldiers come into the settlements promising that they shall not molest any person in their rights nor injure property, and also saying that no more will be sent on and a portion of these soon sent away. We have therefore concluded to let them come in and go through G. S. L. City expecting that they will go off to Rush, and, perhaps, to Cache Valleys. We are still at Provo, and expect to remain here at present. I feel still gratified at your course in attending to your farming operation and making of yourself and as many of your nation as you can good citizens. The President has sent on a new Agent of Indian Affairs by the name of Forney who will probably try and see you after a while. I trust that all things will go right, and that we shall be able to preserve peace, which you know I have always most earnestly taught and desired.
May God bless you, and give you his spirit to dictate you.

Brigham Young

Item sets

Provo, June 22nd. 1858

Arrowpeen, Chief of the Utahs,

I send you 2 pounds of sugar, 1 pound of coffee, and a plug of tobacco. Brother Snow will let you have a little powder and lead.

The President has sent two Men from Washington to ask us to let the soldiers come into the settlements promising that they shall not molest any person in their rights nor injure property, and also saying that no more will be sent on and a portion of these soon sent away. We have therefore concluded to let them come in and go through G. S. L. City expecting that they will go off to Rush, and, perhaps, to Cache Valleys. We are still at Provo, and expect to remain here at present. I feel still gratified at your course in attending to your farming operation and making of yourself and as many of your nation as you can good citizens. The President has sent on a new Agent of Indian Affairs by the name of Forney who will probably try and see you after a while. I trust that all things will go right, and that we shall be able to preserve peace, which you know I have always most earnestly taught and desired.

May God bless you, and give you his spirit to dictate you.

Brigham Young