1858 June 27 Letter to James Ferguson

Title

1858 June 27 Letter to James Ferguson

Description

Gilbert is encouraged to go before the governor and show wherein Brigham is indebted to him. Brigham wants to furnish the soldiers with food. The petition has been signed and forwarded and the settlers will return home when there is evidence the president will honor his pledge.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

James Ferguson

Date

1858 June 27

Location

Provo

Subject

Government
Military
Finances

extracted text

Presidents Office
Provo June 27th 1858
Genl. James Ferguson,
Dear Brother:--
Your favor of the 26th inst. is to hand We are truly gratified with the quiet manner in which the passage of the Army through the city as well as the orderly demeanor of our brethren which, however, we expected as a matter of course. We should be sorry indeed if any of our men, men who profess to be saints, and brethren should demean themselves to bring disgrace upon themselves or reproach upon the fair fame of our beloved city.
I utterly disclaim owing Gilbert & Gerrish a dime, or that I have ever dealt with them upon any other principle than to pay them fairly and honorably for all purchases made of them. I understand that Mr Gilbert is raving about, before the Commissioners and others of my not having dealt fairly by him, and that I am owing him large amounts and that now he is going to put me through &c. &c. I wish therefore that you would have Mr Gilbert go with Levi Stewart and Henry Lawrence, who are acquainted with my dealings with their firm, before Gov. Cumming and the Commissioners, and show them wherein I am indebted to him or the firm of Gilbert & Gerrish.

I understand that the forces look exceedingly bad as <though> they had and were suffering for the want of the comforts of life. I have heretofore offered to furnish them supplies and I now request that you would go to Govr. Cumming and have him see General Johnston <in> regard to this matter. I do actually pity those soldiers and am desirous that they should be supplied with pease, currants, butter, eggs &c and productions of the vallies, which I doubt not would be a source of great benefit to their health as well as comfort; but we would much prefer that an arrangement be made to transact this business direct with the army without going through the hands of those suttlers. If possible have Col. Johnston appoint some person direct from each company to come to some place where such supplies may be collected, and transact the business instead of the traders and suttlers, who are always seeking to take every advantage. In case this arrangement meets with Genl. Johnston's approval, have some judicious persons appointed to collect such supplies for the army, who will deal fair and honorable with both them and the people.
The petition has been sufficiently signed and we send it back to be forwarded.
It would be well to have Livingston and Bell and perhaps some others also to sign it, or a similar petition, at least, asking for the same objects, and stating that in their opinion it should be granted.
We do not consider it advisable to return to our homes just at present, but when we receive reliable information that the reinforcements are actually ordered back and witness still further the peaceable disposal of the army here, then we can return with a feeling of assurance that the President is sincere and intends to carry out his pledges made through his Commissioners.
May the Lord bless and preserve you with all the faithfull

Your Bro in the Gospel

Brigham Young

Item sets

Presidents Office
Provo June 27th 1858

Genl. James Ferguson,

Dear Brother:--
Your favor of the 26th inst. is to hand We are truly gratified with the quiet manner in which the passage of the Army through the city as well as the orderly demeanor of our brethren which, however, we expected as a matter of course. We should be sorry indeed if any of our men, men who profess to be saints, and brethren should demean themselves to bring disgrace upon themselves or reproach upon the fair fame of our beloved city.

I utterly disclaim owing Gilbert & Gerrish a dime, or that I have ever dealt with them upon any other principle than to pay them fairly and honorably for all purchases made of them. I understand that Mr Gilbert is raving about, before the Commissioners and others of my not having dealt fairly by him, and that I am owing him large amounts and that now he is going to put me through &c. &c. I wish therefore that you would have Mr Gilbert go with Levi Stewart and Henry Lawrence, who are acquainted with my dealings with their firm, before Gov. Cumming and the Commissioners, and show them wherein I am indebted to him or the firm of Gilbert & Gerrish.

I understand that the forces look exceedingly bad as <though> they had and were suffering for the want of the comforts of life. I have heretofore offered to furnish them supplies and I now request that you would go to Govr. Cumming and have him see General Johnston <in> regard to this matter. I do actually pity those soldiers and am desirous that they should be supplied with pease, currants, butter, eggs &c and productions of the vallies, which I doubt not would be a source of great benefit to their health as well as comfort; but we would much prefer that an arrangement be made to transact this business direct with the army without going through the hands of those suttlers. If possible have Col. Johnston appoint some person direct from each company to come to some place where such supplies may be collected, and transact the business instead of the traders and suttlers, who are always seeking to take every advantage. In case this arrangement meets with Genl. Johnston's approval, have some judicious persons appointed to collect such supplies for the army, who will deal fair and honorable with both them and the people.

The petition has been sufficiently signed and we send it back to be forwarded.

It would be well to have Livingston and Bell and perhaps some others also to sign it, or a similar petition, at least, asking for the same objects, and stating that in their opinion it should be granted.

We do not consider it advisable to return to our homes just at present, but when we receive reliable information that the reinforcements are actually ordered back and witness still further the peaceable disposal of the army here, then we can return with a feeling of assurance that the President is sincere and intends to carry out his pledges made through his Commissioners.

May the Lord bless and preserve you with all the faithfull
Your Bro in the Gospel

Brigham Young