1858 July 17 Letter to Jacob G. Bigler

Title

1858 July 17 Letter to Jacob G. Bigler

Description

Brigham warns caution in travel due to Indian hostilities.

Type

Correspondence
Indian Affairs

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Jacob G. Bigler

Date

1858 July 17

Location

Great Salt Lake City
Nephi

Subject

Indian Affairs
Bishops

extracted text

President's Office G. S. L. City,
July 17th. 1858.
Bishop Jacob G Bigler,
Nephi;
Dear Bro.
We regret to learn from a note just received from Bro. Warren S. Snow, the continued hostilities of those San Pitch Indians; It appears that they are still disposed to commit depredations and kill the brethren, you will therefore see the neccessity of not permitting the brethren to camp in, or near, or travel through any kanyon or other exposed place, or go after timber or wood, without a sufficient escort to make them perfectly safe, you must be exceedingly careful in all of your movements, and so instruct the brethren, and see that they abide your instructions, and not expose themselves. In the time endeavour to conciliate the Indians, and obtain a salutary influence with them if possible.
We must do the best we can with our savage neighbours, until we can dispose of our kind civilized friends, who have been so magnaminously sent to protect us from the Indians; when we trust we shall be able to regain that peaceful influence over them, which has hitherto so universally prevailed over all our Settlements.---
Praying the Lord to bless you, and help Israel to triumph over all their foes. I remain truly
Your Brother in the Gospel of Christ

Brigham Young

Item sets

President's Office G. S. L. City,
July 17th. 1858.

Bishop Jacob G Bigler,
Nephi;

Dear Bro.
We regret to learn from a note just received from Bro. Warren S. Snow, the continued hostilities of those San Pitch Indians; It appears that they are still disposed to commit depredations and kill the brethren, you will therefore see the neccessity of not permitting the brethren to camp in, or near, or travel through any kanyon or other exposed place, or go after timber or wood, without a sufficient escort to make them perfectly safe, you must be exceedingly careful in all of your movements, and so instruct the brethren, and see that they abide your instructions, and not expose themselves. In the time endeavour to conciliate the Indians, and obtain a salutary influence with them if possible.

We must do the best we can with our savage neighbours, until we can dispose of our kind civilized friends, who have been so magnaminously sent to protect us from the Indians; when we trust we shall be able to regain that peaceful influence over them, which has hitherto so universally prevailed over all our Settlements.---
Praying the Lord to bless you, and help Israel to triumph over all their foes. I remain truly

Your Brother in the Gospel of Christ

Brigham Young