1858 August 15 Letter to Samuel A. Woolley

Title

1858 August 15 Letter to Samuel A. Woolley

Description

Public works will remain in Parowan. Brigham encourages the work of the Pail factory but counsels financial prudence.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Samuel A. Woolley

Date

1858 August 15

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

2

Subject

Business Matter
Financial

extracted text

Presidents Office
Great Salt Lake City Aug. 15. 1858
Saml. A. Woolley
Dear Bro:--
Your note of the 7 inst. is received, we intend to send two teams to Parowan for the remainder of the Press, and improve the opportunity to forward to you the things you sent for.
We also send a sheet of Iron for Bro Davis for the boiler, for the sugar cane, as he wished.
We expect the Public Works now at Parowan to remain there at present. We have not resumed yet at this place, and when we do, it is doubtful if we shall remove those works, as we consider such works necessary in other parts of the Territory as well as this, moreover we understand that Parowan furnishes the very best lumber for pails that has yet been discovered in these Mountains. It is not wisdom to go into building at present. live in a shanty or dug-out, or in any place that will afford warmth and shelter, and let the machine make something before going into extra expenses. You can surely find some suitable place to live in. We would reccommend not to indulge in any kind of extravagance in trying experiments apart from the legitimate business of the Pail factory, but seek to bring every thing to bear directly upon getting out the Buckets. I would reccommend that the stave be from a quarter to one third thicker than is usual in patent pails. We think if every thing is managed properly the pails ought to be afforded at about One Dollar and a half ($1.50)
We are not issuing Currency just at present, but rather calling it in. You will be perfectly safe in taking it for pails or any other kind of work.

We suppose that you have a plenty pretty good stock of hoop iron on hand, but still it would be well to get more if you can do so. You are at liberty to sell buckets, but be sure that you get such pay as you can use to sustain the works.
We have no news of general interest, all appears to be working right in regard to our enemies. The hounds are however still coming and going, and t# prospect is that we shall have plenty of them the ensuing winter.
May God bless you and all Israel and help them to triumph over all their enemies.

I remain as ever your Brother
in the Gospel of Christ

Brigham Young

P. S. Of course you will give Bro Davis the perusal of this letter. Enclosed is the bill of the articles sent.
B. Y.

Item sets

Presidents Office
Great Salt Lake City Aug. 15. 1858

Saml. A. Woolley

Dear Bro:--
Your note of the 7 inst. is received, we intend to send two teams to Parowan for the remainder of the Press, and improve the opportunity to forward to you the things you sent for.

We also send a sheet of Iron for Bro Davis for the boiler, for the sugar cane, as he wished.

We expect the Public Works now at Parowan to remain there at present. We have not resumed yet at this place, and when we do, it is doubtful if we shall remove those works, as we consider such works necessary in other parts of the Territory as well as this, moreover we understand that Parowan furnishes the very best lumber for pails that has yet been discovered in these Mountains. It is not wisdom to go into building at present. live in a shanty or dug-out, or in any place that will afford warmth and shelter, and let the machine make something before going into extra expenses. You can surely find some suitable place to live in. We would reccommend not to indulge in any kind of extravagance in trying experiments apart from the legitimate business of the Pail factory, but seek to bring every thing to bear directly upon getting out the Buckets. I would reccommend that the stave be from a quarter to one third thicker than is usual in patent pails. We think if every thing is managed properly the pails ought to be afforded at about One Dollar and a half ($1.50)

We are not issuing Currency just at present, but rather calling it in. You will be perfectly safe in taking it for pails or any other kind of work.

We suppose that you have a plenty pretty good stock of hoop iron on hand, but still it would be well to get more if you can do so. You are at liberty to sell buckets, but be sure that you get such pay as you can use to sustain the works.

We have no news of general interest, all appears to be working right in regard to our enemies. The hounds are however still coming and going, and t# prospect is that we shall have plenty of them the ensuing winter.

May God bless you and all Israel and help them to triumph over all their enemies.

I remain as ever your Brother
in the Gospel of Christ

Brigham Young

P. S. Of course you will give Bro Davis the perusal of this letter. Enclosed is the bill of the articles sent.

B. Y.