1858 August 13 Letter to Dwight Eveleth

Title

1858 August 13 Letter to Dwight Eveleth

Description

Utah market prices are discussed and Brigham asks for prices on paper in San Francisco.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Dwight Eveleth

Date

1858 August 13

Location

Great Salt Lake City

Number of Pages

3

Subject

Business Matters

extracted text

President's Office
Great Salt Lake City Aug. 13. 1858.
Elder Dwight Eveleth,
Dear Brother:--
You are doubtless aware, ere this, that `all difficulties with Utah' have been authoritatively pronounced to be `amicably adjusted', and Genl. Johnston and his command are encamped in Cedar Valley, some 35 Miles S. W. of this City, amid heat, dust and chagrining disappointment, their own laurels trailing sadly. Indeed, were it not for the presence and extra impudence of certain characters who delight in disseminating corruption, it would scarcely be known that troops are quartered in Utah.
Imported goods are abundant in our market, and the prices operate quite favorably as a protective tariff in favor of domestic manufacture, sugar selling at 65. per lb., and other articles in proportion. Unfortunately for the traders, Cash is very scarce in Utah, and the troops are very shy about paying out money to the `Mormons'; the result of present operations will probably appear ere long, much to the discomfiture of those who hate righteousness.
Our wheat harvest is pretty good, but vegetables are and will be scarce in all the counties north of Utah, owing to the late movements of the people. The large influx of horses and cattle is rendering hay scarce and high priced.
Many of the Officers of Genl. Johnston's command are gone and going east on furlough, and how many changes will take place ere winter it is still difficult to foresee.

You are probably aware that the late difficulties deranged our plans for procuring a regular supply of printing paper, causing us to print the `News' on a half sheet and in diminished number, and since the way is again open for transportation, I wish to learn the relative market value of printing paper in San Francisco and St Louis. Paper purchased in St. Louis costs us on an average, in St. Louis about $3.00 a ream. The paper for the `News" should be 22 by 33 inches plump, and should weigh about 30 pounds a ream, and more rather than less. You will confer a favor by informing me, as soon as you can consistently attend to the matter, the price per ream of paper in San Francisco, of the size and weight above named, and the additional cost of shipping it to San Pedro. The cost of transportation from San Pedro, or by the northern route from Sacramento, we can determine here. I would also like to know what opportunities, with cash at command, might turn up for buying such paper as we want at auctions or other forced sales, and the probably saving in such cases. In case the `Standard' press, type and fixtures are not sold, I deem it best to hold on to them for the present; and if they are stored at a high rent, policy dictates that they be stored at a low rent or, better still, at no rent, if within your power to accomplish it.
Your early attention to the requests herein contained and your letters upon such other topics as you may deem of interest will oblige,

Your Brother in the Gospel

Brigham Young

Item sets

President's Office
Great Salt Lake City Aug. 13. 1858.

Elder Dwight Eveleth,

Dear Brother:--
You are doubtless aware, ere this, that `all difficulties with Utah' have been authoritatively pronounced to be `amicably adjusted', and Genl. Johnston and his command are encamped in Cedar Valley, some 35 Miles S. W. of this City, amid heat, dust and chagrining disappointment, their own laurels trailing sadly. Indeed, were it not for the presence and extra impudence of certain characters who delight in disseminating corruption, it would scarcely be known that troops are quartered in Utah.

Imported goods are abundant in our market, and the prices operate quite favorably as a protective tariff in favor of domestic manufacture, sugar selling at 65. per lb., and other articles in proportion. Unfortunately for the traders, Cash is very scarce in Utah, and the troops are very shy about paying out money to the `Mormons'; the result of present operations will probably appear ere long, much to the discomfiture of those who hate righteousness.

Our wheat harvest is pretty good, but vegetables are and will be scarce in all the counties north of Utah, owing to the late movements of the people. The large influx of horses and cattle is rendering hay scarce and high priced.

Many of the Officers of Genl. Johnston's command are gone and going east on furlough, and how many changes will take place ere winter it is still difficult to foresee.

You are probably aware that the late difficulties deranged our plans for procuring a regular supply of printing paper, causing us to print the `News' on a half sheet and in diminished number, and since the way is again open for transportation, I wish to learn the relative market value of printing paper in San Francisco and St Louis. Paper purchased in St. Louis costs us on an average, in St. Louis about $3.00 a ream. The paper for the `News" should be 22 by 33 inches plump, and should weigh about 30 pounds a ream, and more rather than less. You will confer a favor by informing me, as soon as you can consistently attend to the matter, the price per ream of paper in San Francisco, of the size and weight above named, and the additional cost of shipping it to San Pedro. The cost of transportation from San Pedro, or by the northern route from Sacramento, we can determine here. I would also like to know what opportunities, with cash at command, might turn up for buying such paper as we want at auctions or other forced sales, and the probably saving in such cases. In case the `Standard' press, type and fixtures are not sold, I deem it best to hold on to them for the present; and if they are stored at a high rent, policy dictates that they be stored at a low rent or, better still, at no rent, if within your power to accomplish it.

Your early attention to the requests herein contained and your letters upon such other topics as you may deem of interest will oblige,

Your Brother in the Gospel

Brigham Young