1851 November 25 Letter to Nathan Tanner

Title

1851 November 25 Letter to Nathan Tanner

Description

Instructions for Nathan Tanner to return the livestock and property he took from Sister Hickman

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

Nathan Tanner

Date

1851/11/25

Location

Great Salt Lake City
S. Cottonwood

Subject

Property
Domestic Disputes

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City, Mpv. 25, 1851

Dear Brother,
I understand that you have taken a yoke of oxen, Cow, &c. from sister William Hickman on account of debt against him, which you was to wait for until his return, and that you procured the oxen through guile by obtaining them as a loan in the first instance, and now refuse to give them up altho' six weeks or more have intervened since, thus leaving sister Hickman without a team to haul wood or any means of transportation.
Now Brother Tanner, whether Brother Hickman owes you, makes very little difference at present. If he was here and had property; and if you had any claim against him you might have stopped his going, if you had been so disposed, and should not now after that he has gone seek to take advantage of his family. It is therefore considered best for you to return the oxen, cow or other property, to sister Hickman without further delay, and by so doing, do yourself a favor for which you will always feel thankful.
Praying that the blessing and peace of God may rest upon you, and all the saints, I remain your friend and brother in the Gospel of peace,

Brigham Young,

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City, Nov. 25, 1851 

Dear Brother, 

I understand that you have taken a yoke of oxen, Cow, &c. from sister William Hickman on account of debt against him, which you was to wait for until his return, and that you procured the oxen through guile by obtaining them as a loan in the first instance, and now refuse to give them up altho' six weeks or more have intervened since, thus leaving sister Hickman without a team to haul wood or any means of transportation. 

Now Brother Tanner, whether Brother Hickman owes you, makes very little difference at present.  If he was here and had property; and if you had any claim against him you might have stopped his going, if you had been so disposed, and should not now after that he has gone seek to take advantage of his family.  It is therefore considered best for you to return the oxen, cow or other property, to sister Hickman without further delay, and by so doing, do yourself a favor for which you will always feel thankful. 

Praying that the blessing and peace of God may rest upon you, and all the saints, I remain your friend and brother in the Gospel of peace, 

Brigham Young,