1851 December 4 Letter to David Evans

Title

1851 December 4 Letter to David Evans

Description

Letter to a Bishop regarding marital problems and a separation between a husband and wife.

Type

Correspondence

Sender

Brigham Young

Recipient

David Evans

Date

1851/12/04

Location

Great Salt Lake City
Dry Creek, Utah

Subject

Bishop

extracted text

Great Salt Lake City Dec. 4, 1851

To David Evans
Bishop of Dry Creek-- Utah Co.
Dear brother
ln relation to the affair of brother Bell and family I wish to say that it is my feelings that brother Bell should do right and treat his Wife as he should, and not abuse her as he has hitherto done, and further be reconciled unto his Stepson Clayborne Elder. It is folly for a man to say that he loves a woman, and yet despise and hate her offspring, and if he should unfortunately entertain such feelings it would be wisdom for him to get rid of them, as soon as possible, by enlarging the capacity of his mind to a righteous forbearance for the errors of others, inasmuch as all men have more or less of them, and very few if any are perfect; therefore it becomes the duty of every man to abide his Covenants and not permit trivial matters to intervene, when peradventure that he is partially if not altogether as much to blame as any one.
Nevertheless if there is no congeniality of feeling between brother Bell and wife, and they cannot in anywise agree, it will probably be best for them to separate by his giving unto her and the children a large proportion of the property. I feel a little more particular about this, on account of its being the earnings of the family and children, quite as much as his own.
This is my decision, if that matter cannot be reconciled as it should be, then separate, but let that be the last resource, for covenant breakers have their lot with unbelievers, with sentiments of esteem
I remain your brother in the Gospel of Peace
Brigham Young

Item sets

Great Salt Lake City Dec. 4, 1851

To David Evans
Bishop of Dry Creek-- Utah Co.

Dear brother
ln relation to the affair of brother Bell and family I wish to say that it is my feelings that brother Bell should do right and treat his Wife as he should, and not abuse her as he has hitherto done, and further be reconciled unto his Stepson Clayborne Elder.  It is folly for a man to say that he loves a woman, and yet despise and hate her offspring, and if he should unfortunately entertain such feelings it would be wisdom for him to get rid of them, as soon as possible, by enlarging the capacity of his mind to a righteous forbearance for the errors of others, inasmuch as all men have more or less of them, and very few if any are perfect; therefore it becomes the duty of every man to abide his Covenants and not permit trivial matters to intervene, when peradventure that he is partially if not altogether as much to blame as any one.

Nevertheless if there is no congeniality of feeling between brother Bell and wife, and they cannot in anywise agree, it will probably be best for them to separate by his giving unto her and the children a large proportion of the property.  I feel a little more particular about this, on account of its being the earnings of the family and children, quite as much as his own.

This is my decision, if that matter cannot be reconciled as it should be, then separate, but let that be the last resource, for covenant breakers have their lot with unbelievers, with sentiments of esteem

I remain your brother in the Gospel of Peace

Brigham Young